draw

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Draw

To aim a firearm, or deadly weapon, at a particular target.

To prepare a written bill of exchange, Commercial Paper, draft, or negotiable instrument and place one's signature on it, creating a legal obligation under its terms. To write a document, such as a deed, complaint, or petition, including the essential information necessary to make it legally effective upon its execution by the designated parties.

To lawfully remove money from an account held in a bank, treasury, or other depository.

draw

v. 1) to prepare any document. 2) specifically to have prepared and sign a bill of exchange or check.

draw

to write in due form. In relation to a BILL OF EXCHANGE, to draw a bill is to write it (draw it) in such a way that an unconditional order is addressed to another (the drawee).
References in classic literature ?
"I'll make a paper to that same and put it with the ship's articles," was Van Horn's reply.
He wriggled more determinedly, and Van Horn set him down on the deck.
"It's all right, Jerry, old man, brace up and be a man-dog," Van Horn soothed him.
Captain Van Horn was a handsome man and a striking man, although Jerry did not know it.
Again, while Captain Van Horn and the mate, Borckman, gave orders, and while the Arangi's mainsail and spanker began to rise up the masts, Jerry loosed all his heart of woe in what Bob told Derby on the beach was the "grandest vocal effort" he had ever heard from any dog, and that, except for being a bit thin, Caruso didn't have anything on Jerry.
At this moment, anchor broken out and headsails running up, Captain Van Horn, whose quick eye had missed no detail of the incident, with an order to the black helmsman turned to applaud Jerry.
This was too much, and the black, afraid more of Van Horn than of Jerry, turned and fled for'ard, leaping to safety on top of the eight Lee-Enfield rifles that lay on top of the cabin skylight and that were guarded by one member of the boat's crew.
She had gleaned enough from von Horn to understand that some important scientific experiments were to be undertaken; but what their nature she could not imagine, for she had not the slightest conception of the success that had crowned her father's last experiment at Ithaca, although she had for years known of his keen interest in the subject.
von Horn were only there, thought the distracted girl.
Von Horn had explained its mechanism to her in detail, and on one occasion had allowed her to operate it on the voyage from Singapore.
At the same moment there was a shot from the shore followed by loud yelling, and the girl turned to see her father and von Horn pulling rapidly toward the Ithaca.