Horse

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HORSE. Until a horse has attained the age of four years, he is called a colt. (q.v.) Russ. & Ry. 416. This word is sometimes used as a generic name for all animals of the horse kind. 3 Brev. 9. Vide Colt; Gender; and Yelv. 67, a.

References in classic literature ?
3000, and it would well support three or four times that number; of mares 800, together with 150 broken-in horses, and 600 sheep.
The morning was bright, he had a good horse under him, and his heart was full of joy and happiness.
"Is it possible that you are a Real Horse?" he murmured.
"I understand," said Jack, cheerfully "That's the kind of horse you are now sitting on."
The immense droves of horses owned by the Indians consumed the herbage of the surrounding hills; while to drive them to any distant pasturage, in a neighborhood abounding with lurking and deadly enemies, would be to endanger the loss both of man and beast.
"Then what is the reason they do not put them on riding horses; especially on ladies' horses?" said I.
This last obstacle having been overcome, the troop pursued their course with their accustomed ardor; but some of the horses could no longer sustain this pace; three of them stopped after an hour's gallop, and one fell down.
Hunt consulted, to conceal all knowledge or suspicion of the meditated treachery, but to keep up a vigilant watch upon the movements of Rose, and a strict guard upon the horses at night.
At such moments, when the wind cut his eyes so as to make the tears spring from them, when the saddle had become burning hot, when the galled and spurred horse reared with pain, and threw behind him a shower of dust and stones, D'Artagnan, raising himself in his stirrups, and seeing nothing on the waters, nothing beneath the trees, looked up into the air like a madman.
So they travelled on for about ten minutes, when suddenly, through the slanting screen of wind-driven snow, something black showed up which moved in front of the horse.
'Stay here and look after the horse. I must go home and give your mother a message, but I shall be back soon.'
However, the fox bid him be of good cheer, and said, 'I will help you; lie down there, stretch yourself out quite stiff, and pretend to be dead.' The horse did as he was told, and the fox went straight to the lion who lived in a cave close by, and said to him, 'A little way off lies a dead horse; come with me and you may make an excellent meal of his carcase.' The lion was greatly pleased, and set off immediately; and when they came to the horse, the fox said, 'You will not be able to eat him comfortably here; I'll tell you what--I will tie you fast to his tail, and then you can draw him to your den, and eat him at your leisure.'