Housekeeper

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HOUSEKEEPER. One who occupies a house.
     2. A person who occupies every room in the house, under a lease, except one, which is reserved for his landlord, who pays all the taxes, is not a housekeeper. 1 Chit. Rep. 502. Nor is a person a housekeeper, who takes a house, which be afterwards underlets to another, whom the landlord refuses to accept as his tenant; in this case, the under-tenant aid the, taxes and let to the tenant the, first floor of the house, and the rent was paid for the whole house to the tenant, who paid it to the landlord. Id. note.
     3. In order to make the party a house-keeper, he must be in actual possession of the house; 1 Chit. Rep. 288 and must occupy a whole house. 1 Chit. Rep. 316. See 1 Barn. & Cresw. 178; 2 T. R. 406; 1 Bott, 5; 3 Petersd, Ab. 103, note; 2 Mart. Lo. R. 313.

References in classic literature ?
The housekeeper obeyed with great satisfaction, and the worthy "Esplandian" went flying into the yard to await with all patience the fire that was in store for him.
"In that case," said the housekeeper, "here, into the yard with them!"
The housekeeper, a person of some education and intelligence, thoughtfully brought upstairs with her some milk and some warm water.
"Why, Lord bless me," cried the housekeeper, "that must be Mrs.
The first change of expression which relaxed the iron tensity of the housekeeper's face showed itself when she heard that reply.
The refined insolence of the housekeeper's pity was a woman's insolence; and it stung her into instantly controlling herself.
Lecount's habitual practice to decide everything for her master in the first instance, and then to persuade him that he was not acting under his housekeeper's resolution but under his own, she would have seen it now.
"It is not related to visitors; it is almost forgotten," says the housekeeper, advancing.
The story has nothing to do with a picture; the housekeeper can guarantee that.
Now, the housekeeper was at that time clearing the table; my guardian, taking no heed of her, but with the side of his face turned from her, was leaning back in his chair biting the side of his forefinger and showing an interest in Drummle, that, to me, was quite inexplicable.
I could hardly wonder that the poor old housekeeper trembled from head to foot when she spoke of him.
She longed to inquire of the housekeeper whether her master was really absent, but had not the courage for it.