house

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house

noun abode, accommodations, aedes, busiiess establishment, business firm, clan, commercial estabbishment, company, concern, domicile, domicilium, domus, dwelling, dwelling place, family, firm, habitation, home, homestead, household, kin, kindred, lineage, living place, living quarters, lodging, place of habitation, quarters, shelter, tribe
Associated concepts: House of Representatives
See also: abode, building, business, concern, domicile, dwelling, enterprise, family, firm, habitation, home, homestead, inhabitation, institute, locate, market, parentage, preserve, protect, protection, shelter, structure

HOUSE, estates. A place for the habitation and dwelling of man. This word has several significations, as it is applied to different things. In a grant or demise of a house, the curtilage and garden will pass, even without the words "with the appurtenances," being added. Cro. Eliz. 89; S. C.; 3 Leon. 214; 1 Plowd. 171; 2 Saund. 401 note 2; 4 Penn. St. R; 93.
     2. In a grant or demise of a house with the appurtenances, no more, will pass, although other lands have been occupied with the house. 1 P. Wms. 603; Cro. Jac. 526; 2 Co. 32; Co. Litt. 5 d.; Id. 36 a. b.; 2 Saund. 401, note 2.
     3. If a house, originally entire, be divided into several apartments, with an outer door to each apartment and no communication with each other subsists, in such case the several apartments are considered as distinct houses. 6 Mod. 214; Woodf. Land. & Ten. 178.
     4. In cases of burglary, the mansion or dwelling-house in which the burglary might be committed, at common law includes the outhouses, though not under the same roof or adjoining to the dwelling-house provided they were within the curtilage, or common fence, as the dwelling or mansion house. 3 Inst. 64; 1 Hale, 558; 4 Bl. Com. 225; 2 East, P. C. 493; 1 Hayw. N. C. Rep. 102, 142; 2 Russ. on Cr. 14.
     5. The term house, in case of arson, includes not only the dwelling but all the outhouses, as in the case of burglary. It is a maxim in law that every man's house is his castle, and there he is entitled to perfect security; this asylum cannot therefore be legally invaded, unless by an officer duly authorized by legal process; and this process must be of a criminal nature to authorize the breaking of an outer door; and even with it, this cannot be done, until after demand of admittance and refusal. 5 Co. 93; 4 Leon. 41; T. Jones, 234. The house may be also broken for the purpose of executing a writ of habere facias. 5 Co. 93; Bac. Ab. Sheriff, N 3.
     6. The house protects the owner from the service of all civil process in the first instance, but not if he is once lawfully arrested and he takes refuge in his own house; in that case, the officer may pursue him and break open any door for the purpose. Foster, 320; 1 Rolle, R. 138; Cro. Jac. 555; Bac. Ab. ubi sup. In the civil law the rule was nemo de domo sua extrahi debet. Dig. 50, 17, 103. Vide, generally, 14 Vin. Ab. 315; Yelv. 29 a, n. 1; 4 Rawle, R. 342; Arch. Cr. Pl. 251; and Burglary.
     7. House is used figuratively to signify a collection of persons, as the house of representatives; or an institution, as the house of refuge; or a commercial firm, as the house of A B & Co. of New Orleans; or a family, as, the house of Lancaster, the house of York.

References in periodicals archive ?
They said it reinforced the idea that housework was a woman's task.
Accordingly, an empirical examination of the intersections between masculinity and housework when fathers stay home is critical in our attempts to understand whether inequalities in housework persist even when men are full-time caregivers.
A wide-ranging comparison of British lives these days with those of 30 years ago revealed that women are spending more time at work and devoting less time to housework, Science Daily reported.
Rather than trying to understand and correct this growing trend, some are more interested in another finding about unemployed males: that even when men are out of work, they STILL do less housework than women
The survey also found the most popular bit of housework was cooking.
With the majority of housework falling to women, survey findings also indicate that over two thirds (65%) of women reverted back to traditional household cleaning roles upon starting a family.
Recent studies have showed a surprising correlation between sexual satisfaction and the distribution of housework between partners.
Despite the growing involvement of men, women are still doing the lion~s share of housework across the board.
What she found was that men who were married or living with a woman and working in a profession typically populated with women did more housework than men working in male-dominated jobs.
Research by sociologist Elizabeth McClintock of Indiana's University of Notre Dame shows that, when married or cohabiting men are employed in heavily female occupations--such as teaching, childcare work, or nursing--they spend more time doing housework, compared to when they are employed in traditionally male jobs.