Hypothesis

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Related to hypotheses: null hypotheses

Hypothesis

An assumption or theory.

During a criminal trial, a hypothesis is a theory set forth by either the prosecution or the defense for the purpose of explaining the facts in evidence. It also serves to set up a ground for an inference of guilt or innocence, or a showing of the most probable motive for a criminal offense.

References in periodicals archive ?
To limit the probability of erroneously rejecting one or more of [N.sub.0] true null hypotheses to an overall level [[alpha].sub.0], Walker's criterion is that only individual tests with p values no larger than [[alpha].sub.Walker] should be regarded as significant, where (e.g., Wilks 2006)
These hypotheses clearly stated the perception of collaboration, nurse satisfaction, and patient satisfaction would increase (predicted direction) after rounding was implemented.
In this study chi-square was used to test statistical hypotheses and to rate the hypotheses Friedman test was used.
The first ratio on the right side of the equation is known as the prior odds--the relative probability of the two hypotheses based on evidence prior to acquiring the new data.
Furthermore, when Newton was writing the Opticks, he started out Part I as follows: "My design in this book is not to explain the properties of light by hypotheses, but to propose and prove them by reason and experiments" (5).
hypotheses for a parameter, say [theta] (where one rejects or does not
Theories are hypotheses that have survived the test of time but, like hypotheses, they can be revised or rejected with new evidence.
While some of the functional hypotheses were difficult, designing an effective treatment is the most difficult aspect of the simulation.
This paper has two goals: to remind researchers of issues regarding multiple hypotheses and to provide a few helpful guidelines.
The player's goal is to deduce the code in as few hypotheses as possible.
</pre> <p>After the case was written, the counselor then anticipated students' questions and hypotheses. Possible responses were predicted to ensure that confusing or unnecessary information was removed from the case and that questions posed would lead students to the stated objectives.