ICE

(redirected from iceberg)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to iceberg: Burberry, titanic

ICE

abbreviation for INSTITUTE OF CHARTERED ENGINEERS.
References in classic literature ?
The iceberg drifts slowly, over the black water, through the ashy light.
The sleeper on the iceberg is the man who has robbed him of Clara--who has wrecked the hope and the happiness of his life.
The iceberg drifts slowly--over the black water; through the ashy light.
Throughout a large part of the United States, erratic boulders, and rocks scored by drifted icebergs and coast-ice, plainly reveal a former cold period.
I will only say that as far as regards the occurrence of identical species at points so enormously remote as Kerguelen Land, New Zealand, and Fuegia, I believe that towards the close of the Glacial period, icebergs, as suggested by Lyell, have been largely concerned in their dispersal.
Lyell, that the large quadrupeds lived subsequently to that period, when boulders were brought into latitudes at which icebergs now never arrive: from conclusive but indirect reasons we may feel sure, that in the southern hemisphere the Macrauchenia, also, lived long subsequently to the ice-transporting boulder-period.
The blast smelt of icebergs, arctic seas, whales, and white bears, carrying the snow so that it licked the land but did not deepen on it.
Sanson said the iceberg is now nearing a glacier at a speed of about half a mile a day, but a direct hit on the glacier seems unlikely.
One iceberg could provide enough for one million people over five years.
The amount of freshwater in a transported iceberg could be the equivalent to one year's worth of output from a typical desalination plant in a region devoid of a permanent water source.
Ice loss can occur in the form of melt-induced (liquid) freshwater discharge into the ocean, or through (solid) iceberg calving.
KING'S POINT, Canada - At dusk, tourists marvel at the sensational collapse of an iceberg at the end of its long journey from Greenland to Canada's east coast, which now has a front-row seat to the melting of the Arctic's ice.