idiosyncrasy


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References in periodicals archive ?
"As artists and adopted Liverpudlians aware of the historical links between the two cities, we felt the need to tell a story about some aspects of Shanghai's idiosyncrasy," they continue.
The first three chapters introduce inclusive leadership and the idiosyncrasy credit model of leadership and place it in the context of classic and current leadership research.
Laurence Grafftey-Smith's career in the famous (and sometimes infamous--for the idiosyncrasy of its officers) Levant Consular Service covered Egypt, Iraq, Albania and Arabia during a critical period of regional history--from the middle of the First World War to the end of the 1940s.
Then there's the idiosyncrasy of the interest rate climate.
Ultimately, however, In Defence of History surmounts these and other problems of authorial idiosyncrasy. Despite several criticisms, it is a book that I am resoundingly glad was written, although not quite in the way it was.
But for all the engaging idiosyncrasy of the passage, is it really worth charging public institutions with the task of preserving every edition of every paper ever published?
So let's hope their young striker Alan Smith (left) develops into a world-class talent, as he has already developed an egotistical little idiosyncrasy more reminiscent of the Don Revie era.
However, there is still a great degree of country-specific idiosyncrasy in specialization patterns.
Both pieces immerse Curran in singular style, but they lack the idiosyncrasy of his 1998 Each of Both, a piece with searching emotional themes that are not as well developed as those of Five, but which do point him in the right direction.
NASA engineers commanded the craft to switch to its backup transmitter, but that device has its own idiosyncrasy: Electronic noise, known as a whistle, prevents it from sending a clear signal to Earth (SN: 1/25/92, p.63).
On several occasions, however, Mania convincingly evokes the viral strain in recollection that can turn both private and collective histories into structures rotten with falsehoods that someone has wanted to believe--particularly so when he mutes his tendency toward wild and unlikely idiosyncrasy. I don't know whether the boy he's drawn, standing half-smiling and half-sad and clutching a long white candle beside a votive image of Christ, ever really existed; but I'm sufficiently convinced that this avatar of uncomplicated traditionalism and embryonic hurt is an integral, irrepressible part of Andrew Mania's mental lumber-room.
The work presented inside each introverted gallery is informed by mobility and cr oss-fertilization, by the interpenetration of infrastructure with the flow and idiosyncrasy of real life.