illegitimate

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Related to illegitimates: illegitimacy, Out-of-wedlock

illegitimate

(Born out of wedlock), adjective bastard, misbegot, misbegotten, nothus, of illicit union, unlawfully begotten, unnatural
Associated concepts: illegitimate children, legitimation, paaernity proceeding, presumption of legitimacy
Foreign phrases: Parentum est liberos alere atiam nothos.It is the duty of parents to support their children even when illegitmate. Qui nascitur sine legitimo matrimonio, matrem sequitur. He who is born out of lawful matrimony succeeds to the condition of his mother. Non est justum aliquem antenatum post mortem facere bastardum qui toto temmore vitae suae pro legitimo habebatur. It is not just to make anyone a bastard after his death, who during his lifeeime was regarded as legitimate. Justum non est aliquem antenatum mortuum facere bastardum, qui pro tota vita sua pro legitimo habetur. It is not just to make a bastard after his death one elder born who all his life has been accounted legitimate. Qui ex damnato coitu nascuntur inter liberos non computentur. They who are born of an illicit union should not be reckoned among the children.

illegitimate

(Illegal), adjective against the law, banned, contrary to law, criminal, forbidden, illicit, impermissible, interdicted, lawbreaking, malfeasant, non legitimus, not according to law, not permitted, outlawed, outside the law, prohibited, prohibited by law, proscribed, unallowed, unauthorized, unlawful, unlicensed, unsanctioned, wrongful
See also: felonious, illegal, illicit, impermissible, improper, irregular, spurious, synthetic, ultra vires, unauthorized, unlawful, wrongful

ILLEGITIMATE. That which is contrary to law; it is usually applied to children born out of lawful wedlock. A bastard is sometimes called an illegitimate child.

References in periodicals archive ?
C3P daimed not to have experienced the teasing and cruelty that other illegitimates remembered.
85) Most illegitimates report a degree of self-loathing that is much more acute and enduring than their legitimate peers.
87) Furthermore, the legal discrimination that illegitimates experienced was actual, not imaginary.
Did things improve for illegitimates over the century?
For instance, although much working-class history has emphasized the importance of the mother, the experience of illegitimates makes it dear just how crucial the relationship with the father was for children.
Further, the experience of illegitimates can revise the notion of the supremacy of the "nuclear" family by the late 19th and early 20th centuries.
The experience of illegitimates also revises some major ideas in the history of children.
The legal position and disabilities of illegitimates remained largely unchanged until late in the 20th century, unaffected by the family law reforms of the 1920s and the general loosening of standards during the two world wars.
The plight of illegitimate children was a well-known trope in Victorian fiction, and a concern to reformers of marriage law as well as those who worked for children's rights.
Many historians have studied the history of childhood in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century, but these studies have rarely made any distinction between legitimate and illegitimate children.
Children were illegitimate for any number of reasons, including rapes, seductions, adultery, failed courtships, and long-term cohabitation.
How the lives of illegitimate children progressed depended on many factors, including the family's class, the level of secrecy about their status, and the success or failure of the relationship between the parents.