imagination

(redirected from imaginational)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Idioms, Encyclopedia.

imagination

noun conceive, concept, conception, conceptualization, creation, creative power, creativity, idea, illusion, image, imaginative faculty, innovativeness, inventiveness, perception, presumption, vision
Associated concepts: perjury, trumped-up charges
References in periodicals archive ?
The imaginational OE is more than divergent thinking or just the capacity to imagine.
The origin variable was a statistically significant predictor of observed alphas for only two of the subscales (Intellectual OE and Imaginational OE subscales).
Including the study of science fiction as part of the curriculum is an excellent way to model the idea that thinking in the imaginational domain is important.
Another OE frequently found among the gifted population is imaginational OE (Bouchet & Falk, 2001).
According to Dabrowski (1972), the areas of overexcitability are psychomotor, intellectual, imaginational, sensual, and emotional.
The second analysis used the overexcitability subscale scores as measured by the OEQII (psychomotor, sensual, imaginational, intellectual, emotional).
However, characteristics associated with giftedness, such as psychomotor, intellectual, sensual, emotional, and imaginational overexcitabilities (Piechowski, 1999), may actually be risk factors for poor personal outcomes (Robinson, 2002).
Dabrowski believed that some people display supersensitivities or overexcitabilities in several areas: psychomotor (increased levels of physical activities), intellectual (increased levels of intellectual activities), sensual (expanded awareness), imaginational (high levels of imagination), and emotional (intensified emotions).
Kazimierz Dabrowski, who is referred to in many of the studies reviewed here, saw heightened sensitivity and emotional intensity (which he called overexcitabilities) in the psychomotor, sensual, intellectual, imaginational, and emotional domains as the "building blocks" for development.
For example, Dabrowski's overexcitabilities (Dabrowski & Piechowski, 1977; Piechowski, 1979) include the emotional area as one distinguishing feature of giftedness along with four other separate modes of mental functioning, namely, psychomotor, sensual, imaginational, and intellectual.
Dabrowski (1972) used the phrase psychic overexcitability and defined it as "higher than average responsiveness to stimuli, manifested either by psychomotor, sensual, emotional (affective), imaginational, or intellectual excitability, or the combination thereof " (p.