impeach

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Impeach

To accuse; to charge a liability upon; to sue. To dispute, disparage, deny, or contradict; as in to impeach a judgment or decree, or impeach a witness; or as used in the rule that a jury cannot impeach its verdict. To proceed against a public officer for crime or misfeasance, before a proper court, by the presentation of a written accusation called Articles of Impeachment.

In the law of evidence, the testimony of a witness is impeached by earlier statements that the witness has made if they are inconsistent with the statements to which the witness testifies.

impeach

v. 1) to attempt to prove that a witness has not told the truth or has been inconsistent, by introducing contrary evidence, including statements made outside of the courtroom in depositions or in statements of the witness heard by another. 2) to charge a public official with a public crime for which the punishment is removal from office. One President, Andrew Johnson in 1868, was charged with violation of federal laws in a politically-motivated impeachment, but was acquitted by the margin of one vote in a trial held by the Senate. President Richard Nixon resigned in 1974 rather than face impending impeachment charges brought by the House of Representatives in the Watergate affair, in which he obstructed the investigation and lied to Congress about his participation. Several federal judges have been impeached and nine have been found guilty by the Senate.

impeach

verb accusare, accuse, accuse of maladminnstration, accuse of misconduct, admonish, animadvert, attack, attaint, blame, bring a charge, bring charges, bring into discredit, bring to account, bring to justice, bring up for investigation, call in question, call to account, cast an immutation upon, cast blame upon, castigate, censure, challenge, challenge the credibility of, charge, charge to, charge with, complain against, condemn, confute, criticize, declaim against, decry, denigrate, denounce, denunciate, disapprove, discredit, disparage, dispute, expose, fault, file a claim, find an indictment against, hold at fault, implicate, impugn, impute fault to, inculpate, incur blame, indict, indict for maladministration, prefer a claim, prefer charges, put on trial, put the blame on, rebuff, recriminate, reproach, reprove, ridicule, take to account, vituperate
Associated concepts: impeach a government official, immeach a witness
See also: accuse, betray, blame, cite, condemn, defame, denounce, depose, disapprove, discharge, dismiss, except, fault, impugn, inform, object, remove, reprehend, reprimand, sully
References in periodicals archive ?
Two weeks ago only 35 percent were for impeaching Trump.
The report said the "high crimes and misdemeanors" clause for impeaching a sitting president in the Consitution applied to all "ordinary" citizens acting against U.
After much painful soul-searching, I've reached the conclusion that impeaching the president for repeatedly and willfully lying under oath is necessary to protect the rule of law, which is the foundation of our republic.
Americans unhappy with the election of Donald Trump as the 45th president of the United States searched Google on Wednesday for guidance on how to impeach a president while a law professor indicated there may already be enough evidence to justify impeaching Trump for fraud and racketeering.
Impeaching Aquino at this point, she said, was "practically in practice, impossible.
Postponing the debate and the vote on impeaching Clinton only delayed what appeared to be increasingly inevitable: that Clinton will become the second president ever impeached by the House and sent to the Senate for trial.
With under two months to go until the November presidential and congressional elections, House Republicans are unsure how to approach impeaching Koskinen, which would satisfy many of their hardline supporters but is likely to fail and could leave them exposed when voters head to the ballots, the (http://www.
announces his support for impeaching President Clinton at a news conference Tuesday.
The American Civil Liberties Union of Southern California is urging members of Congress to vote against impeaching President Clinton after the chapter voted 36-5 to stand against impeachment, the executive director announced Monday.
The separation of the two perjury articles - one for grand jury lies, one for those in the Jones case - is significant because many Republicans have expressed concern with impeaching the president for lies in a case that was thrown out of court.
House Speaker Newt Gingrich, meanwhile, officially alerted House members to be ready to return to Washington by Wednesday, underscoring the inevitability of a historic vote on impeaching the president of the United States.
At the same time, it is difficult to develop a strategy that would allow lawmakers to vote to censure Clinton instead of impeaching him.