impossible to describe

See: ineffable
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References in classic literature ?
It is impossible to describe it, you must picture it to yourself.
It is impossible to describe the effect produced by the last words of the honorable president-- the cries, the shouts, the succession of roars, hurrahs, and all the varied vociferations which the American language is capable of supplying.
So long as histories are written of separate individuals, whether Caesars, Alexanders, Luthers, or Voltaires, and not the histories of all, absolutely all those who take part in an event, it is quite impossible to describe the movement of humanity without the conception of a force compelling men to direct their activity toward a certain end.
She moved towards him with her hands extended, and had just seized him when the catch of the locked box--due to some movement from within-- flew open, and the king-cobra-killer flew at her with a venomous fury impossible to describe.
What she suffered through the long hours it would be impossible to describe.
They had seen me cut the cables, and thought my design was only to let the ships run adrift or fall foul on each other: but when they perceived the whole fleet moving in order, and saw me pulling at the end, they set up such a scream of grief and despair as it is almost impossible to describe or conceive.
I FIND it impossible to describe my sensations while the carriage was taking me to Major Fitz-David's house.
Her simple artless behaviour, and modest kindness of demeanour, won all their unsophisticated hearts; all which simplicity and sweetness are quite impossible to describe in print.
That I love so much, and never can help thinking of,' and it is impossible to describe the use he made of his eyes when he said this--'do--for my sake, do.
Afterwards, when he tried to do so, Aynesworth found it impossible to describe the expression which flitted across her face.
From the time when she had accidentally looked toward the red-brick house, something in her manner which it is quite impossible to describe, had suggested to my mind that this obstacle was not only something she could not mention, but something that she was partly ashamed of, partly afraid of, and partly doubtful about.
That night a thoroughly happy, completely tired-out Anne returned to Green Gables in a state of beatification impossible to describe.