impotence


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impotence

n. the male's inability to copulate. Impotence can be grounds for annulment of a marriage if the condition existed at the time of the marriage and grounds for divorce whenever it occurs under the laws of 26 states. It should not be confused with sterility, which means inability to produce children.

impotence

noun debilitation, debility, failure, feebleness, helplessness, impotency, impuissance, inability, inadequacy, incapacitation, incapacity, incompetence, incompetency, ineffectiveness, ineffectuality, ineffectualness, inefficacy, inefficiency, ineptitude, infirmitas, lack of power, lack of strength, powerlessness, unfitness, weakness
See also: desuetude, detriment, disability, fault, frailty, impuissance, inability, inaction, incapacity, inefficacy, languor, prostration

IMPOTENCE, med. jur. The incapacity for copulation or propagating the species. It has also been used synonymously with sterility.
     2. Impotence may be considered as incurable, curable, accidental or temporary. Absolute or incurable impotence, is that for which there is no known relief, principally originating in some malformation or defect of the genital organs. Where this defect existed at the time of the marriage, and was incurable, by the ecclesiastical law and the law of several of the American states, the marriage may be declared void ab initio. Com. Dig. Baron and Feme, C 3; Bac. Ab. Marriage, &c., E 3; 1 Bl. Com. 440; Beck's Med. Jur. 67; Code, lib. 5, t. 17, l. 10; Poyn. on Marr. and Div. ch. 8; 5 Paige, 554; Merl. Rep. mot Impuissance. But it seems the party naturally impotent cannot allege that fact for the purpose of obtaining a divorce. 3 Phillim. R. 147; S. C. 1 Eng. Eccl. R. 384. See 3 Phillim. R. 325; S. C. 1 Eng. Eccl. R. 408; 1 Chit. Med. Jur. 877; 1 Par. & Fonb. 172, 173. note d; Ryan's Med. Jur. 95. to 111; 1 Bl. Com. 440; 2 Phillim. R. 10; 1 Hagg. R. 725. See, as to the signs of impotence, 1 Briand, Med. Leg. c. 2, art. 2, Sec. 2, n. 1; Dictionnaire des Sciences Medicales, art. Impuissance; and, generally, Trebuchet, Jur. de la. Med. 100, 101, 102; 1 State Tr. 315; 8 State Tr. App. No. 1, p. 23; 3 Phillm. R. 147; 1 Hagg. Eccl. R. 523; Fodere, Med. Leg. Sec. 237.

References in periodicals archive ?
There are some popular herbs like ginkgo biloba, yohimbe and tribulus available in online market for curing ED or male impotence. Tribulus terrestris is one of the most promising herbs; it helps cure ED and other sexual dysfunctions.
Detectives urged anyone who has bought the black tablets, which are being sold as herbal supplements for impotence, to stop taking them and contact police.
Experts have warned that there could be a rise in impotence due to men suffering from an increase in stress and anxiety - caused by long working hours, home pressures and the recession.
Dr Miriam says: Despite the fact that one in 10 men over the age of 21 suffers from impotence, very few understand why it happens.
For a long time the main explanation for impotence was the notion that impotence starts in the head and that it is caused by an inappropriate emotional state.
Some experts want doctors to ask about impotence in over-40s health checks.
Impotence, the old term for male erectile dysfunction, is a unique problem.
The historical range is important and necessary to give a sense of both change and continuity in the West's obsession with impotence. However, the treatment across the ages from classical antiquity through Christianity's gradual hegemony, to the rise of sexual science via Freud that fostered a cultural preoccupation with (male) sexual performance, is at times a little unbalanced.
McLaren begins his work on impotence by asking the obvious: "Who today hasn't heard of Viagra?" (p.
its impotence Without happy colors Only the gray of eyes And the green
SOARING demand is forcing Scotland's health boards to spend pounds 25million a year on impotence drug Viagra.