impotence


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impotence

n. the male's inability to copulate. Impotence can be grounds for annulment of a marriage if the condition existed at the time of the marriage and grounds for divorce whenever it occurs under the laws of 26 states. It should not be confused with sterility, which means inability to produce children.

impotence

noun debilitation, debility, failure, feebleness, helplessness, impotency, impuissance, inability, inadequacy, incapacitation, incapacity, incompetence, incompetency, ineffectiveness, ineffectuality, ineffectualness, inefficacy, inefficiency, ineptitude, infirmitas, lack of power, lack of strength, powerlessness, unfitness, weakness
See also: desuetude, detriment, disability, fault, frailty, impuissance, inability, inaction, incapacity, inefficacy, languor, prostration

IMPOTENCE, med. jur. The incapacity for copulation or propagating the species. It has also been used synonymously with sterility.
     2. Impotence may be considered as incurable, curable, accidental or temporary. Absolute or incurable impotence, is that for which there is no known relief, principally originating in some malformation or defect of the genital organs. Where this defect existed at the time of the marriage, and was incurable, by the ecclesiastical law and the law of several of the American states, the marriage may be declared void ab initio. Com. Dig. Baron and Feme, C 3; Bac. Ab. Marriage, &c., E 3; 1 Bl. Com. 440; Beck's Med. Jur. 67; Code, lib. 5, t. 17, l. 10; Poyn. on Marr. and Div. ch. 8; 5 Paige, 554; Merl. Rep. mot Impuissance. But it seems the party naturally impotent cannot allege that fact for the purpose of obtaining a divorce. 3 Phillim. R. 147; S. C. 1 Eng. Eccl. R. 384. See 3 Phillim. R. 325; S. C. 1 Eng. Eccl. R. 408; 1 Chit. Med. Jur. 877; 1 Par. & Fonb. 172, 173. note d; Ryan's Med. Jur. 95. to 111; 1 Bl. Com. 440; 2 Phillim. R. 10; 1 Hagg. R. 725. See, as to the signs of impotence, 1 Briand, Med. Leg. c. 2, art. 2, Sec. 2, n. 1; Dictionnaire des Sciences Medicales, art. Impuissance; and, generally, Trebuchet, Jur. de la. Med. 100, 101, 102; 1 State Tr. 315; 8 State Tr. App. No. 1, p. 23; 3 Phillm. R. 147; 1 Hagg. Eccl. R. 523; Fodere, Med. Leg. Sec. 237.

References in periodicals archive ?
Male impotence and weak erection problems can be cured by this herbal combination.
Dr Miriam says: Despite the fact that one in 10 men over the age of 21 suffers from impotence, very few understand why it happens.
Bayer will offer a pack of four Levitra tablets - one of three impotence drugs prescribed by the NHS - for just 7.
For a long time the main explanation for impotence was the notion that impotence starts in the head and that it is caused by an inappropriate emotional state.
Some experts want doctors to ask about impotence in over-40s health checks.
Starting from the Greek and Roman world, Impotence: A Cultural History proceeds through Christian Europe and the domination of the Church, which discussed impotence in the context of marriage.
The role played by the cultural focus of this work strengthens and binds the sometimes selective evidence, and it is here that McLaren's details bond into something that keeps the past relevant to the present: impotence as a joke; females being rapacious and demanding while being "passive"; sexual performance as a marker of physical decrepitude.
He uses early chapters to remind readers that what seems familiar really is not and emphasizes throughout this work that social needs and expectations framed discussions of impotence.
Once again, impotence, Frustration The implacable grinding of teeth
SOARING demand is forcing Scotland's health boards to spend pounds 25million a year on impotence drug Viagra.
Knowsley has the lowest number of adults eating healthily in Britain, and above-average smoking, both of which can cause impotence.
An accusation of impotence was one of the few ways to shed an unwanted spouse in early modern Spain.