improvement of the mind

See: education
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It entails, as the writer put it, "elevation and improvement of the mind." These frames served as my conceptual lens for this study because I was interested in connecting students' histories, identities, and literacies.
Henrietta Matthews, who are two very worthy ladies fully capable of filling the situations they do, and who use every exertion in their power for the elevation and improvement of the minds of those belonging to the Societies, and all others who apply to them for any instruction that is in their power to give.
Development or improvement of the mind by education or training.
Montagu persuaded Hester Chapone (1721-1801) to publish her Letters on the Improvement of the Mind: Addressed to a Young Lady (1773), an extremely popular educational tract, which was reprinted at least sixteen times in the next twenty-five years.
For instance, Chapone's Letters on the Improvement of the Mind sets out a program for home education for girls to match what was taught to boys by their private tutors or schoolmasters.
Chapone's Letters on the Improvement of the Mind may have been modelled on Astell's Proposal.
Pomona also offered translations from various languages in its pages, including a letter by Talbot, two poems by Carter, and an extract from Chapone's Letters on the Improvement of the Mind. (13) Clodius, wife of the Leipzig professor Christian August Clodius, lived a more retired life about which little seems to be known, although she was apparently well-educated and acquired knowledge of English, French, and even Latin (Schindel 1: 99-101).
Liberal learning, therefore, includes both the improvement of the mind and the cultivation of those virtues that are indispensable to the pursuit of the truth of matters.
Though its principal foundations were set in improvement of the mind, this appreciation could also extend to physical recreation.
Hester Mulso Chapone, whose Letters on the Improvement of the Mind (1773) was the most widely read work of the first generation of bluestockings, published nothing after her second volume (Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1775) ) despite the fact that, as a widow of narrow means, she had found the small additional income from her works to be of great use.
113; Hester Mulso Chapone, Letters on the Improvement of the Mind, Addressed to a Young Lady (Boston, 1783), p.
Hester Mulso Chapone, whose Letters on the Improvement of the Mind (1773) was the most widely read work of the first generation of bluestockings, published nothing after her second volume (Miscellanies in Prose and Verse (1775)) despite the fact that, as a widow of narrow means, she had found the small additional income from her works to be of great use.

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