improvise

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improvise

verb adept, ad-lib, compose, concoct, devise, extemporize, fabricate, invent, invent offhand, make up, originate, play by ear, ride with the waves, utilize, without preparation
See also: compose, conjure, contrive, create, devise, invent, make, originate, scheme
References in periodicals archive ?
In what follows, I first discuss the way that Plautus can play on the competing scripting techniques of the written and improvisatory modes.
This eighth-note modal figure (Phrygian mode) is the foundation of the work and continues throughout the piece, while the right hand contains improvisatory elements (Example 12).
The authors suggest caution when considering further investigation of the patient's verbal interpretation of their improvisatory experiences because it could be "potentially challenging" (p.
Rather than relying on a perceived set of criteria that focuses on the performance practice of a musician, improvisatory practice needs to include factors such as natural and learned abilities, as well as intuitiveness, experimentation and creative insight.
The best referent for what Johnson calls ragtime in the novel is probably the improvisatory stride style of James P.
She calls this improvisatory state "open attention," and the whole experience a "dive" because the mover travels beneath the surface of known movement.
As Borgo's first book, it is a remarkable attempt to bridge the gap between the humanities and the sciences (often an improvisatory act in its own right), especially given that music is vastly under-theorized in the humanities itself.
Shadows achieves additional verisimilitude by means of its improvisatory nature.
LeRoy collaborated with Van Sant on numerous script drafts on the way to the film's final improvisatory style, and LeRoy is credited as an associate producer on the final cut.
This hardly matters, however, since the book is consequently able to provide a framework for discussions of so many seemingly disparate areas of interest, such as Catherine Gallagher's highly original examination of nineteenth-century tales about Britain's anti-slave-trade squadron, and John Bowen's improvisatory essay about mourning, death, and Little Nell.
Often his metaphysical wit surprises and delights the reader, and the poems here are well constructed in terms of their improvisatory poetics.