impulse

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impulse

noun actuation, drive, encouragement, immelling force, impetus, impulsio, impulsion, impulsus, incentive, motivation, motive, pressure, push, spontaneity, spontaneous inclination, stimulant, sudden desire, sudden force, thrust
Associated concepts: heat of passion, impulsive acts, irreeistible impulse, uncontrollable impulse
See also: catalyst, cause, desire, impetus, incentive, motive, passion, reason, stimulus
References in periodicals archive ?
They also did not significantly differ in age at diagnosis, duration of disease, or history of impulse control disorder.
Con el termino impulse control disorders [MeSH], se encontraron 10.281 documentos, de los que el 65,41% correspondia al concepto de juego patologico; el 10,17%, a tricotilomania; el 8,47%, a conductas adictivas, y el 7,70%, a piromania.
(85) Both the DSM-III and its successor, the DSM-IV, did not label pathological gambling as an addictive mental disorder, but classified the condition in a general category of "impulse control disorders not elsewhere classified." (86) In addition to gambling disorder, this catchall category included kleptomania, (87) intermittent explosive disorder, (88) pyromania, (89) and trichotillomania.
Rockmore is a clinical psychologist with expertise in child development, impulse control disorders, and social and emotional learning.
Of special note are the new chapters addressing cultural neuropsychology, somatic disorders, and the relationship between drug abuse and impulse control disorders. Throughout, relevant diagnostic information has been updated to reflect the newest DSM-5 criteria.
[10] For the International Classification of Diseases-11 (ICD-11), however, it has been proposed that compulsive sexual disorder be included as one of the impulse control disorders. [11]
As we all know, OCD has several subtypes and overlaps with a spectrum of related disorders (body dysmorphism, hypochondriasis, some eating disorders, and even impulse control disorders).
However, PD may also present with other neuropsychiatric syndromes and for the purpose of this article we have classified them into: 1) Anxiety disorders, 2) Apathy, 3) Involuntary emotional expression disorder, 4) Sleep disorders, and 5) Impulse control disorders.
A study coauthored by Jason Schnittker, an associate professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, shows that many of the most common psychiatric disorders found among former inmates, including impulse control disorders, emerge in childhood and adolescence and, therefore, predate incarceration.
Studies suggest that impulse control disorders, like addiction, lead to dysregulation of the prefrontal cortex circuitry (Jentsch & Taylor 1999).
As with SUDS and PG, psychiatric comorbidity is common in compulsive shopping populations, including mood (21-100%); anxiety (41-80%); substance use (21-46%); eating; (8-35%) personality (60%); and impulse control disorders (21-40%: see Black, 2007; Christenson, Faber, & de Zwaan et al., 1994; Dell'Osso, Allen, Altamura, Buoli, & Hollander, 2008; Monahan, Black, & Gabel, 1996).