in plain view


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"In Plain View" is a smoothly engaging read featuring carefully crafted and memorable characters deftly woven into a story that grasps the readers total attention from first page to last.
"People should not leave valuable items in plain view in their vehicles," Gordon said.
place where the seized item was in plain view; (2) the item's
Are "hidden files" really in plain view? What if file tables
Householders are also asked to consider what a stranger looking though a front window would see - car keys left on coffee tables, presents in plain view and other easy to grab items.
commit crimes in plain view, utterly secure in their de facto immunity from the immigration law."
Mexico--like many other countries--is so overtly corrupt that federal officials are complicit in the trafficking, and it often takes place in plain view. However, once it crosses over into the U.S., this despicable commerce is done secretly and out of sight.
Once the preliminary search was completed and no illegal weapons were found, the telephone company security officer was called in to identify any company equipment that may have been in plain view. The subsequent search by the security officer resulted in the seizure of a "number of relatively inexpensive items belonging to" the telephone company.
New Hampshire.(27) The Court held in Coolidge that police may seize evidence discovered in plain view without a warrant specifying the item(s) in certain circumstances.(28) The Court delineated three requirements for a seizure to be valid under the plain view doctrine: (1) the initial intrusion must be justified by either a warrant or a valid exception to the warrant requirement; (2) the incriminating character of the object must be immediately apparent; and (3) the discovery of the object must be inadvertent.(29)
Hicks(39) a majority of the Court reaffirmed that probable cause is sufficient to invoke the plain view doctrine.(40) The Court determined that if probable cause is satisfied, officers may seize evidence of crime or contraband in plain view or conduct a further search of that material.(41) The majority remarked that it would be "absurd" to permit seizure of an object but not allow closer examination of that object before seizure.(42) Because the state conceded in Hicks that it did not have probable cause to conduct a further search, the officer's act of moving a stereo to read the serial number was an impermissible further search.(43)
During this walk-through, the officers find evidence of the crime in plain view. The subject subsequently files a motion to suppress the evidence, alleging that it is the fruit of an unconstitutional search.
A federal district court suppressed the evidence that officers found in plain view upon entering the house.