real

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Real

In Civil Law, relating to a thing (whether movable or immovable), as distinguished from a person. Relating to land, as distinguished from Personal Property. This term is applied to lands, tenements, and hereditaments.

real

denoting or relating to immovable property such as land and tenements.

POINDING, REAL, or poinding of the ground, Scotch law. Though it be properly a diligence, this is generally considered by lawyers as a species of real action, and is so called to distinguish it from personal poinding, which is founded merely on an obligation to pay.
     2. Every debitum fundi, whether legal or conventional, is a foundation for this action. It is therefore competent to all creditors in debts which make a real burden on lands. As it proceeds on a, real right, it may be directed against all goods that can be found on the lands burdened but, 1. Goods brought upon the ground by strangers are not subject to this diligence. 2. Even the goods of a tenant cannot be poinded for more than his term's rent, Ersk. Pr. L. Scot. 4, 1, 3.

REAL. A term which is applied to land in its most enlarged signification. Real security, therefore, means the security of mortgages or other incumbrances affecting lands. 2 Atk. 806; S. C. 2 Ves. sen. 547.
     2. In the civil law, real has not the same meaning as it has in the common law. There it signifies what relates to a thing, whether it be movable or immovable, lands or goods; thus, a real injury is one which is done to a thing, as a trespass to property, whether it be real or personal in the common law sense. A real statute is one which relates to a thing, in contradistinction to such as relate to a person,

References in periodicals archive ?
When, in reality, it was Israel and Washington that refused to budge from their rejectionist stands, forcing an often-times desperate and autocratic Anwar Sadat or Yasser Arafat to literally sue for peace by abandoning already moderate and conciliatory positions.
In reality, as Safty demonstrates, opposition to the Accords cut across wide sections of Egypt's political and intellectual classes, and importantly opposition was not against a peace with Israel per se, but against Sadat's unilateral concessions on Egypt's negotiating principles which required Israeli withdrawal from all occupied Arab territories, restitution of Palestinian national rights, and achievement of a comprehensive peace treaty.
In reality it is a unique study of the workings of the imagination, with Coleridge as an example.