inapropos

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I didn't see last year's late-season recast, but the highly praised Bryn Terfel could hardly have made a slimier or scarier Scarpia than Falk Struckmann, who (despite some very audible tiring towards the end of Act 11) enacted and sang--in a not entirely inapropos Teutonic fashion--as vivid a Roman police chief as I've heard since the glory days of Tito Gobbi and Gabriel Bacquier.
"How odd" Harold Bloom remarks, "if we spoke of 'the politics of Walter Pater.' It will seem odd then to speak of the politics, rather than the literary agon, of Virginia Woolf." (10) But it is not inapropos at all to speak of Pater's "politics," if we accept that "politics" comprises more than political parties, and that even critics such as Pater (and Bloom) "have" a politics of literature.
For this reason alone, Patterson's deployment of Weber is inapropos. On Hart's view, the position that voluntary affirmative action programs such as Kaiser's are permissible was neither valid nor invalid prior to a court's decision.(119) That proposition became valid law only after the exercise of legislative discretion by a court, and in consequence of both (1) the court's decision and (2) the practice of legal officials to identify law with reference to precedents, statutes, and constitutions as part of the rule of recognition.
The second criteria, which requires "relative disinterestedness,"(148) may, at first blush, appear inapropos to a domestic intervention in which the coup plotters are anything but disinterested.