inarticulate

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inarticulate

adjective abstruse, abysmal, close, deficient, deprived of speech, fumbling, garbled, guarded, inadequate, inaudible, incommunicative, inconversable, indiscernible, indistinct, ineffective, inelegant, inferior, laconic, muffled, mute, nebulous, not able to vocalize a position, not fluent, not glib, not polished, not smooth, opaque, parum distinctus, poor, reserved, reticent, silent, sparing of words, taciturn, tongue-tied, unclear, unintelligible, unplain, unrefined, untrained, vague, withdrawn
See also: mute, speechless, taciturn
References in periodicals archive ?
The sublime nonsense of "Plara's sonnets" is interrupted by the qualifying "But--but--which makes inarticulacy feel tantamount to a moral principle, by comparison to the Gallicized affectation of "[p]ricked," "crinkled," "pursed.
Lawrence toys with Tom's inarticulacy, his unfamiliarity with the spoken world, and thus the contrast between "'Ay, I'm commin'" and the language of his "angry sense of futility and disappointment" is inevitable.
His defiant inarticulacy feeds the notion that Coldplay are a pop group in rock clothing.
Jack and his father clearly love each other, yet are trapped in a painful inarticulacy toward each other--most poignantly expressed when the old man says that Jack has never 'Chad a name for me.
Uniquely this age is a time when the frustrations of inarticulacy and inexpressibility occasion rage (independent of the trauma's violence) and despair.
While Bewes is oriented to cliche and the shame of language in Cambridge and Crossing the River, my parallel project examines instances of intertextual catachresis in Higher Ground: in cliche "eloquence and inarticulacy collide" (Bewes 48), as in catachresis.
Shalev writes with terrific accuracy and empathy about the life of childrenhow they communicate despite their inarticulacy, how they overcome helplessness or resign themselves to it.
These words of wisdom from the past--not-so-distant in the case of Beuys or Motherwell--seem almost designed to chastise present-day artists for their inarticulacy and apparent disregard for tradition.
This repetition of "homme" demonstrates more than just Orgon's inarticulacy or even Tartuffe's human weakness; the point is also that he is a man and not a woman.
Hayes sees her inarticulacy as the result of a clash of genres, emphasising "the way she is confronted by the divergent forms of sociability asserted by the countergenre that is unfolding around her"; in doing so, he unconsciously duplicates Mrs Curren's own tendency to interpret her experience in literary terms.
In "The Primacy of Good" (chapter 5), Brewer argues that in ethics, naturalistic "buck-passing" of values to either nonevaluative properties or reasons for action produces either vicious circularity or substantial evaluative inarticulacy.