inaugurator


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He is the Creator of man and of woman, the inaugurator of marriage, and the Sanctifier of matrimony.
De Cleyre's biographer, Paul Avrich (1978, 14) writes about her "striking resemblance to Mary Wollstonecraft, the inaugurator of the modern women's rights movement, about whom she often wrote and lectured.
Whether by his technique, his compositions, or through sheer accumulation of students, Liszt has come to be viewed as the inaugurator of the golden age.
12) In his 1930 drama, The Reign of God, (13) he emphasized Jesus' role as the inaugurator of the reign of God and avoided speculation about the nature of Christ, whom he saw as the leader of a new type of humanity.
Of Wittenberg's inaugurator of Protestantism, Montaigne says: "I have observed in Germany that Luther has left behind him as many schisms and dissensions concerning the uncertainties in his beliefs as he raised about the Holy Scriptures.
And Chapter five, "Translating Chaucer for Modernity," on the case of Dryden (whose Fables Ancient and Modern provides Congenial Souls with its title), reflects on his status as inaugurator of the modern publicly private practice of Chaucerians who "imagine themselves into the presence of Chaucer, his books, and his other readers" (2002, 148).
First, it affirms God as the Inaugurator of time and space and thus as Author of history and Controller of the cosmos.
Alfarabi is again in this chapter mentioned only a few times, but he is presented not only as the inaugurator of Islamic political philosophy, but of medieval political philosophy in general.
In Whitla's view, Morris' experiments with manuscript illumination and studies of medieval and humanist calligraphy made him "the inaugurator of the revival of handwriting in the modern period," and he describes Morris' several handwritings in The Earthly Paradise drafts and calligraphic saga editions, defends his translations' archaisms as examples of conscious "defamiliarization," and interprets Morris' publishing of manuscripts as rejections of conventional Victorian publishing's more exploitive practices.
Turner, Presbyterian minister, missionary scholar, inaugurator of university departments of religious studies, founder of the Centre for New Religious Movements.