incestuous

(redirected from incestuousness)
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incestuous

adjective banned family relationships, criminal family relationships, forbidden family relationships, illegal family relationships, immoral family relationships, improper family relationships, inbred, interbred, prohibited relationship, sexual abnormality, sexual deviance, sexual deviation, sexual offense, sexual perverrion, unlawful family relationships
Foreign phrases: Incestuousi.Those offspring of incestuous relationships.

incestuous

resulting from INCEST.
References in periodicals archive ?
This incestuousness becomes all the more alarming at a time when production slates are being cut and development money curtailed.
Following the contest, during which France seems to hint at Lear's incestuousness ("Sure .
Don't expect the media networks to tell you, for they can't, because of incestuousness between the media and the government, and big business, which they both serve.
She skillfully draws parallels between several themes and motifs in the two novels (ancestral influence, guilt, sexuality and incestuousness, the house and garden, etc.
And how can James be so sure that no father lurks around the supposedly unproblematic incestuousness which she sees in the kava myths and rites?
The Tessier-Ashpools' decadence, incestuousness, extreme wealth, and hermetic lives become a lesson in the dangers of tampering with human identity.
It is still a smart and sassy comedy, despite its incestuousness and occasional lapses into obvious, laboured jokes (Chandler take a bow).
The insolent and mocking way that Patrick Moore (a distinguished man whose many achievements include the definitive mapping of the moon) was treated during his presentation was nothing short of disgraceful, but worse still was the sheer incestuousness of the evening.
A page of musing on the true masters of each Cabinet department is shrewd and useful, as are a few paragraphs on the social incestuousness of the capital.
Rather, the book takes as some part of its subject a notion we may call incestuousness, as the term might loosely (and approvingly) be applied to some of the relations among characters in Jane Austen's novels.
This acknowledgment that Austen's incestuousness is not really incest is, in its way, a welcome recognition.
Yet there is something in the notion of incestuousness, applied to Austen's novels, to which this study draws attention.