Inch

(redirected from inches)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to inches: ruler

INCH. From the Latin uncia. A measure of length, containing one-twelfth part of a foot.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in classic literature ?
"Very well, my worthy harpooner, if some vertebrate, several hundred yards long, and large in proportion, can maintain itself in such depths-- of those whose surface is represented by millions of square inches, that is by tens of millions of pounds, we must estimate the pressure they undergo.
"Why!" exclaimed Ned Land, "they must be made of iron plates eight inches thick, like the armoured frigates."
Our Soldiers and Lowest Classes of Workmen are Triangles with two equal sides, each about eleven inches long, and a base or third side so short (often not exceeding half an inch) that they form at their vertices a very sharp and formidable angle.
The first ice is especially interesting and perfect, being hard, dark, and transparent, and affords the best opportunity that ever offers for examining the bottom where it is shallow; for you can lie at your length on ice only an inch thick, like a skater insect on the surface of the water, and study the bottom at your leisure, only two or three inches distant, like a picture behind a glass, and the water is necessarily always smooth then.
Stumps thirty or forty years old, at least, will still be sound at the core, though the sapwood has all become vegetable mould, as appears by the scales of the thick bark forming a ring level with the earth four or five inches distant from the heart.
Each flower is composed of six leaves or petals, about three inches in length, of a beautiful crimson, the inside spotted with white.
"I would not argue with any man less than six inches high!" she cried.
These also he set in clay and when the house had been entirely completed he applied a coating of the clay to the entire outside surface to the thickness of four inches.
"If we follow the usual proportion," replied Morgan, "a diameter of 108 inches would require sides of two feet thickness, or less."
It was a frame of wood raised three inches from the ground, about seven feet long, and four wide, moving upon twenty-two wheels.
Their circumference is about two inches, but in some fragments, which are cylindrical and without any furrows, it is as much as four inches.
He now goes to work to set his trap; planting it upon the shore, in some chosen place, two or three inches below the surface of the water, and secures it by a chain to a pole set deep in the mud.