data

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data

noun back-up, documents, evidence, facts, grounds, information, logic, papers, proof, specifics
See also: citation, clue, documentation, dossier, ground, information, intelligence, news, proof, reference, science, study

data

for the puposes of data protection legislation, data is information which is being processed by means of equipment operating automatically in response to instructions given for that purpose, is recorded with the intention that it should be processed by means of such equipment, or is recorded as part of a relevant filing system or with the intention that it should form part of a relevant filing system. It need not be held on a computer.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, as incidence and survival of pediatric ALL increase (1), public health professionals can use recent ALL incidence data to improve local cancer survivorship programs that address chronic disease management, screen for late effects, and provide resources to help patients maintain a high quality of life (10).
We conducted a systematic review for iNTS incidence data by following guidelines of the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (12).
Incidence data do not provide a homogeneous time series because of changes in reporting requirements, changes in population demographics, and the introduction of new diagnostic tests.
Analysis of the above incidence data reveals that .
Though incidence data are still largely anecdotal, the disease seems to be most common in large East Coast cities and in California, and least common in the Mid-west, according to Peterson.
The team has collected data, disease incidence data of general fields across various ecologies of the country and visited research institutes, public and private seed companies.
Consumer group representatives brought up a lack of credible, publicly available critical illness insurance incidence data recently in comments asking state insurance regulators to study whether critical illness insurance products serve a valid purpose.
Using incidence data from the National Cancer Institute s Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention s National Program of Cancer Registries, as provided by the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NCCR), researchers led by Rebecca Siegel, MPH found that during the most recent decade of data (2001 to 2010), overall incidence rates decreased by an average of 3.
The mortality figures and incidence data are contained in two reports: Cancer Facts & Figures 2013 and Cancer Statistics 2013, both published in CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians.
Crude incidence data for GBS were calculated per division and per district on the basis of the population <15 years of age reported by WHO and the Government of Bangladesh.
The researchers performed a meta-analysis of incidence data and reported pooled estimates using the random effects model.