indemonstrable


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indemonstrable

adjective containing variables, doubting, equivocal, incalculable, indecisive, inexplicit, irresolute, irresponsible, not ascertainable, not provable, skeptical, uncertain, unconfirmable, unconvinced, unprovable, unsure, unverifiable
Associated concepts: indemonstrable principles
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On the surface, however, it looks as if Kant has simply taken the bindingness of the moral law as a brute, indemonstrable given, even if he insists that the Factum is given as neither an intellectual intuition nor an empirical matter of fact.
That which is an ascent (anodos) from things that are shown or suggested to the indemonstrable, immediate premises; and finally
This type of knowledge has either an objective character, a demonstrable existence, nor a subjective moral fibber with an indemonstrable existence.
Alternatively, Aristotle might have thought that the subject matter of rational inquiry is indeed pluralistic and that within various sciences one must formulate indemonstrable principles but that the existence of the subject matter is nonetheless capable of some explanation.
Another approach, Ulrich's CSH, similarly provides some guidelines for re-describing the views that enter the conversation, intended in this case to help participants identify the normative and indemonstrable assumptions of each view (Ulrich, 1983, 1987).
As to the impossible claims by Samuel Bawlf that Drake's Golden Hind made a surfer's tour of the Northwest Coast in 44 days and passed through then-deadly Seymour Narrows and the tide rips off Ten Mile Point without two large Yamaha outboard motors strapped on her transom, he has left it to the noted authority, Edward Von der Porten, to answer the indemonstrable claims.
Like his famous predecessor, he promotes a practical philosophy based on experience instead of indemonstrable metaphysical speculations.
My argument, however, is that this charge of contradiction, of heterodoxy, is thoroughly indemonstrable, both historically and theologically.
254) Human law also attempts to delineate proper responses to specific situations that natural law would require, as Aquinas concluded, "it is from the precepts of the natural law, as from general and indemonstrable principles, that the human reason needs to proceed to the more particular determination of certain matters.
Bobzien is particularly illuminating on the dialectical background to Stoic logic (122) and the sense in which the indemonstrable arguments qualified as such (132-33).
These are unjust and completely indemonstrable accusations.
First, while Lisska is of course aware of texts in which Aquinas holds that the first principles of the natural law are self-evident, indemonstrable propositions, he gives no indication of how we are to square his conception of the natural law as derived from speculative truths with Aquinas's insistence that these principles are per se nota.