indemonstrable


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indemonstrable

adjective containing variables, doubting, equivocal, incalculable, indecisive, inexplicit, irresolute, irresponsible, not ascertainable, not provable, skeptical, uncertain, unconfirmable, unconvinced, unprovable, unsure, unverifiable
Associated concepts: indemonstrable principles
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An inquiry, therefore, seeks an explanatory middle term, which can be either demonstrable or indemonstrable, and either distinct from that which it explains or another way of conceiving that very thing.
That which is an ascent (anodos) from things that are shown or suggested to the indemonstrable, immediate premises; and finally
And if Demogorgon's responses to Asia unwork her attempt to confirm God as an "indemonstrable concept of reason," the Symbolic indeterminacy with which he threatens her Romantic ideas is kept at a largely transcendental level in this text whose "imagery" Shelley describes in his Preface to the play as "drawn from the operations of the human mind, or from those external actions by which they are expressed" (PU, 207).
Ogden, (33) John Marshall apologized to his readers for spending so much time "to demonstrate propositions which may have been thought axioms." (34) That is, he assumed that every literate reader out there would know that, before a demonstration or experiment could be offered, certain indemonstrable points had to be in place--indemonstrable because no demonstration could be understood if these points were not grasped.
Yet, as Husserl, remarks, 'identity is wholly indefinable, whereas "alikeness' is\ (LI II, [section]3; my italics) Worse, identity as a result of Platonic idealization proves not only indefinable but indemonstrable. This may very well be the main reason why Husserl invariably turns to formal examples when he wants to illustrate the ideality of linguistic meaning.
Unlike mathematics, Kant thinks metaphysics is a thoroughly analytic science that resolves what is given into 'indemonstrable propositions' that serve as the 'primary data' and 'stuff' from which definitions can be drawn (242-43).
Kelley concludes that the "debts owed by Vico to jurisprudence are incalculable and in some cases almost indemonstrable ...
it is neither sentiment nor enthusiasm (the mysticism is profound, says Hegel, but it is a form of a empty profoundness); by this philosophy differs from the allegorical, illogical and indemonstrable forms of spirit;
indemonstrable, that is, (as the Greeks have said it better) are [TEXT
The postcritical theologian emphasized the necessity of conversion "as a self-modifying act that enables one to look at the world with new eyes." Although theology rested on faith, and faith had a cognitive dimension that could be persuasively presented, nonetheless faith was indemonstrable to those outside its commitment, and the truth of faith could not "be established from within the framework of the unconverted." (9) Postcritical theology was deeply concerned with truth, the reality of the tacit dimension of faith, the validity as well as the limits of the cognitive enterprise, and the confidence that it could set forth a "plausible, comprehensive, and appealing" vision of reality.
Pomponazzi's aim, she claims, is to protect the fully indemonstrable religious doctrines from subjection to rational inquiry.
This type of knowledge has either an objective character, a demonstrable existence, nor a subjective moral fibber with an indemonstrable existence.