indigent

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indigent

1) n. a person so poor and needy that he/she cannot provide the necessities of life (food, clothing, decent shelter) for himself/herself. 2) n. one without sufficient income to afford a lawyer for defense in a criminal case. If the court finds a person is an indigent, the court must appoint a public defender or other attorney to represent him/her. This Constitutional right of counsel for the indigent was determined by Gideon v. Wainright in 1963, when a penciled letter from a prisoner came to the attention of prominent Washington attorney Abe Fortas, who carried the case to the Supreme Court for free. Fortas later became an Associate Justice of the Supreme Court. 3) adj. referring to a person who is very poor and needy.

See: bankrupt, destitute, impecunious, penurious, poor
References in periodicals archive ?
Miraflores said this practice of assisting indigents had long been going on, but the planned scheme will make things easier for the beneficiaries.
9 billion the allocation for indigent senior citizens from P8.
In cases involving indigent clients, the holistic defense philosophy recognizes that a resolution to the legal matter at hand is not the client's only concern; for example, some indigents may have substance abuse problems, mental health challenges, or immigration concerns.
In the mid-1980s, the press reported several stories about the transfer of indigent patients to indigent care centers because the patients lacked health insurance or financial resources.
While there are no states that appoint counsel for the assistance in preparing an application for appellate review, Ohio is an example of a state that appoints counsel to help indigents draft, research, and file an application for reopening a capital case.
Most of those who are arrested and prosecuted are indigent, and the Supreme Court has ruled that the government has a constitutional obligation to provide lawyers for people who cannot afford to hire their own.
of County Comm'rs of Gooding Count, (4) the Supreme Court of Idaho contemplated possible factors boards of county commissioners may consider in determining whether a patient is medically indigent under the Medical Indigency Act ("Act").
Deval Patrick's proposal to overhaul the way legal defense is provided for the indigent aims to save about $45 million annually.
410(a)(5) (providing that the Office of Public Advocacy shall represent indigents who cannot be represented by the public defender due to conflicts of interest); see also Alaska Pub.
335 (1963), the Supreme Court recognized that the Sixth Amendment to the United States Constitution guarantees all indigent criminal defendants the right to a lawyer at the state's expense.
But Lott said city officials' failure to work with his group has created a problem for hospitals treating the indigent.
1974) (denying relief for a claim that the Florida public defender systematically failed to meet minimum constitutional standards in the representation afforded to indigents because the federal abstention doctrine prevented the federal court from intervening in state judicial processes)).