indignation


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indignation

adjective adversarial, adverse, at odds, averse, dead set against, differing, disinclined, fractious, hesitant, hostile, not feeling like, not in favor of, not in the mood, not inclined, obdurate, opposed, queasy, recalcitrant, reluctant, resistant, squeamish, unwilling
Associated concepts: inequality and indignation, moral innignation, righteous indignation
See also: disparagement, resentment, umbrage
References in classic literature ?
She was in a sad state when she got home, and when the older girls arrived, some time later, an indignation meeting was held at once.
She stopped as crimson with shame and indignation as if the viewless singer had risen before her.
My master, after some expressions of great indignation, wondered "how we dared to venture upon a HOUYHNHNM'S back; for he was sure, that the weakest servant in his house would be able to shake off the strongest YAHOO; or by lying down and rolling on his back, squeeze the brute to death.
Let no one, whatever his rank or condition, dare to follow the beautiful Marcela, under pain of incurring my fierce indignation.
A horrid turmoil of mind and body; bursting sobs; broken, vanishing thoughts, now of indignation, now of remorse; broken elementary whiffs of consciousness, of the smell of the horse-hair on the chair bottom, of the jangling of church bells that now began to make day horrible throughout the confines of the city, of the hard floor that bruised his knees, of the taste of tears that found their way into his mouth: for a period of time, the duration of which I cannot guess, while I refuse to dwell longer on its agony, these were the whole of God's world for John Nicholson.
Elizabeth could not see Lady Catherine without recollecting that, had she chosen it, she might by this time have been presented to her as her future niece; nor could she think, without a smile, of what her ladyship's indignation would have been.
As the weeks went by, and he saw her always looking pleased to see him--turning up her lovely face towards him as if she meant him to understand that she was glad for him to come--and going about her work in the same equable way, making no sign of sorrow, he began to believe that her feeling towards Arthur must have been much slighter than he had imagined in his first indignation and alarm, and that she had been able to think of her girlish fancy that Arthur was in love with her and would marry her as a folly of which she was timely cured.
There were cooler and more calculating spirits, however, who had the control of affairs, and felt nothing of the patriotic pride and indignation of these youths.
The affair seemed to grow more complicated, and the Colonel, with his expletives and his indignation, confused rather than informed me.
The boy's father lived in Tercanbury, and there had been much indignation in the city, the local paper had referred to the matter; but Mr.
All society--both the inhabitants of the place and those who came down of an evening for the music--had got hold of one and the same story, in a thousand varieties of detail--as to how a certain young prince had raised a terrible scandal in a most respectable household, had thrown over a daughter of the family, to whom he was engaged, and had been captured by a woman of shady reputation whom he was determined to marry at once-- breaking off all old ties for the satisfaction of his insane idea; and, in spite of the public indignation roused by his action, the marriage was to take place in Pavlofsk openly and publicly, and the prince had announced his intention of going through with it with head erect and looking the whole world in the face.
Whilst they were making their escape, D'Artagnan would return to the king; would justify his return by the indignation which the mistrust of Colbert had raised in him; he would be sent back with full powers, and he would take Belle-Isle; that is to say, the cage, after the birds had flown.