Mutation

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MUTATION, French law. This term is synonymous with change, and is particularly applied to designate the change which takes place in the property of a thing in its transmission from one person to another; permutation therefore happens when, the owner of the thing sells, exchanges or gives it. It is nearly synonymous with transfer. (q.v.) Merl. Repert. h.t.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Gopimony, Anjitha- A new okra variety through induced mutation in interspecific hybrids of Abelmoshus Spp.
Many varieties and a large number of mutants have been obtained through induced mutation approach, but the mutation in most of them is involved in single gene or few loci.
K., 2010, "Induced mutation and selection of High yielding strain of Micrococcus glutamicus for glutamic acid production", J.
Evidence to date suggests that by reducing tillage requirements, soil erosion, water pollution, pesticide use, whilst increasing yields and the capacity to grow crops in previously impossible conditions, GM crops will have a very positive impact on their lives compared with what they might have had had we continued to rely solely on 'conventional' breeding techniques (such as varieties bred by induced mutation often chosen by 'organic' growers).
There were no significant differences in the levels of induced mutation among children of exposed women (active smokers, women who had quit smoking when they found out they were pregnant, and women who were only passively exposed to smoke).
There were no significant differences in levels of induced mutation among children of exposed women (active smokers, women who had quit smoking when they learned they were pregnant, and women who were only passively exposed to smoke).
Improving basmati rice through induced mutation, p.
Strain Spontaneous Mutation Frequency (S) TA7001 0.9 ([+ or -] 0.1) X [10.sup.-8] Ta7004 0.8 ([+ or -] 0.1) X [10.sup.-7] Ta98 1.1 ([+ or -] 0.3) X [10.sup.-7] Strain Induced Mutation Induction Fold Frequency (1) (daunomycia) (120 [micro]g/ml daunomycin) (I/S) TA7001 6.6 ([+ or -] 0.1) X [10.sup.-8] 7.3 Ta7004 6.1 ([+ or -] 0.6) X [10.sup.-7] 7.6 Ta98 4.9 ([+ or -] 0.5) X [10.sup.-6] 44.6 Strain Induced Mutation Induced Fold Frequency (1) (idarubicin) (120 [micro]g/ idarubicin) (I/S) TA7001 2.6 ([+ or -] 0.1) X [10.sup.-8] 2.8 Ta7004 7.0 ([+ or -] 0.1) X [10.sup.-7] 8.7 Ta98 1.8 ([+ or -] 0.3) X [10.sup.-6] 16.1 Table 3 Adriamycin/Epirubicin mutation frequencies of Ames Salmonella stains.
However conventionally induced mutation has some distinct limitations, especially in the applications of crop-breeding, as percentage of desired mutation is very less in the field; by using in vitro techniques with the combination of routine mutagenesis has overawed this obstruction too.
Focusing on induced mutation in food crops, botanists, agricultural scientists, geneticists, and contributors explore mutagenesis as a tool for food security and sustainable human nutrition, and physiological and molecular aspects of mutagenesis.
Kharkwal and Shu [5] reported that induced mutation breeding is becoming more powerful and effective in breeding crop varieties to play a significant role for improving world food security in the coming years and decades.