inebriation

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inebriation

noun alcoholism, bacchanalianism, bibulosity, bibulousness, dipsomania, drunkenness, inebriety, influence of liquor, insobriety, intemperance, intoxication, potation
Associated concepts: driving while intoxicated, drunken driving, under the influence of alcohol
See also: dipsomania
References in periodicals archive ?
Whereas a one-on-one physical confrontation may result in injury, the presence of additional officers may mean that even a violently resisting inebriate can be subdued without serious harm to anyone.
The inebriate subsequently produces a handgun and kills both troopers before escaping.
Alcohol intoxication robs inebriates of their judgment and decisionmaking abilities at the same time that it reduces inhibitions and temporarily impairs motor skills.
Additionally, department personnel should monitor in-custody inebriates for signs of violence or illness.
Consider new techniques to subdue uncooperative inebriates
Hospital superintendents, almshouse managers, and temperance advocates in California continued their quest for a separate inebriate asylum but were defeated by the depression of 1893-98.
No California county ever established an inebriate asylum, though by 1917 Los Angeles and San Diego had created "drunk farms" in connection with their county jails.
Wishing to eliminate inebriate "rounders" from their dockets, magistrates sent a cavalcade of chronic cases to Foxborough - difficult therapeutic material indeed.
Only Norfolk's Boston outpatient office remained intact, but with Prohibition the legislature closed this last remnant of the state inebriate hospital.
They envisioned county courts and probation offices making discriminating use of interrelated psychopathic hospitals, inebriate asylums, and "industrial colonies" in the San Francisco and Los Angeles areas, and coordinating the treatment and custodial functions of such public institutions with the work of local charities.
What went on inside the inebriate institutions of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; were women treated differently than men?
Very few inebriate institutions were established for women, as drunkenness was perceived to be an overwhelmingly male problem.