ineradicable


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Tragedy is the ineradicable risk to which we expose ourselves in the act of using our capacity for freedom" (p.
The truth is, this country has grown blase to the ineradicable culture of corruption.
First, on the idea that Islamophobia is an ineradicable part of Western culture.
After all the meetings and promises, the smog in Southeast Asia from burning to clear land for palm oil plantations still proves ineradicable
Looking ahead to the first of them, conservative pundit George Will bought into the notion of Trump as an ineradicable pest who"says something hideously inflammatory, which is all he knows how to say, and then what do the other nine people onstage do?
For this artist, space itself--depth in both the pictorial and psychological sense--is tempting and ineradicable.
He left his ineradicable footprints for his successors.
We Americans, children of so young a country, can barely fathom such ineradicable grievances.
Nazi anti-Semitism was nourished by such conceptions, and even the notion of ineradicable Jewish racial characteristics has precedent in late medieval circles where some people asserted that conversion to Christianity could not eliminate the evil character of Jewish blood.
The first essay in the volume, Vincent Colapietro's "Traditions of Innovation and Improvisation," demonstrates this well by arguing that jazz works as a metaphor for Peircean philosophy insofar as aspects such as "the spirit of playfulness, a sense of the sacred, and a contrite consciousness of our ineradicable fallibility" motivate both Peirce's philosophy and jazz (16).
Wells-Barnett resisted lynching and believed in the ineradicable right of self-defense for black communities, to whom she recommended gun ownership as well as more conventional tactics of civil disobedience like the boycott and the franchise.
Email has its problems, including ineradicable spam.