inexactness


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While in [22] the main mathematical concern was to establish condition number estimates of the preconditioned system, here the concern is in how to measure the inexactness in the computation of the Schur complement (Hessian) system (1.
He understood why God--whom he didn't believe in, of course--had divided the people one from another, because wasn't it language that was behind everyone's descent into the worst misconceptions, the eternal inexactness of words, the fact that the same word meant one thing to one person, another thing to someone else?
96) But even assuming that psychiatry is meaningfully less exact than other medical sciences, (97) the proper way to deal with the inexactness of psychiatry is not to ban all mental disorder evidence.
Given the numbers of tests surveyed and the selection of protein analytes by inspection, there is significant potential for error or inexactness in the assembled data.
Could it be that the inexactness of both, in so many of the ABC Dictionary's entries, is a sign that neither was done afresh for this book?
In some sense, the inexactness of these common definitions should come as no surprise.
Ambiguity and vagueness, on the other hand, have to do with imprecision and inexactness of events, stimuli, words, concepts, and judgments [.
In the fictional situation Lewis creates, the resolution of Orual's problems requires that she understand her own involvement in what the Christian tradition describes as "original sin," a condition which inevitably causes error, inexactness, and corruption to enter all human actions and perceptions.
Regardless of the inexactness of their classification scheme, Hoffman and his colleagues make an important contribution by demonstrating that the likelihood that a district judge's decision will be accompanied by a written opinion varies significantly depending upon the type of decision.
This became a thematic and organisational principle of the production and the idea of repetition or return(s) a way of demonstrating the inexactness of situating the self and acts of performing the self, echoing aspects of performativity.
Though it does not exhibit all the negative qualities of the sublime, Marvin Bell's "To Dorothy" does begin "to violate purpose in respect to judgment," and clearly suggests how the amplitude and complexities of truth are primarily due to their inexactness.