infelicity


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Any comparison between the Second Law of Thermodynamics and the sacred sphere of literature was just "a cheap journalistic infelicity," Leavis said.
The principal infelicity of the book is the sheer itchiness on the part of the authors about their own methodology and their unreconciled eric and emic perspectives.
For her readers in the literary community she must describe a lot of music efficiently but intelligibly; for those on the musical side she must introduce a literary world that to most of us is unfamiliar and a little bizarre; and when writing for either group she must be constantly aware of the other looking over her shoulder and waiting for a slip, an oversimplification, an ignorant infelicity. So does she succeed?
On occasion infelicity achieves a certain unwitting charm: 'all of mankind are fatally susceptible to Divine Providence' (p.
An infelicity is Doshi's decision to install hidden lighting around the floor edge, which is reminiscent of retail interior decoration.
There's space for one last infelicity from a hymn which begins "All hail the power of Jesu's name..." The lines serve to show that angels, in addition to their chief function as God's messengers, were pretty good at multi-tasking and gymnastics too.
Infelicity of language, unfortunately, makes it something of a chore to read this book, which in many ways deepens our understanding of one of the world's major architects.
How much further can standards deteriorate with such misguided philosophy and verbal infelicity?