infirm


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infirm

(Irresolute), adjective changeable, easily led, faint-hearted, faltering, fickle, inconstant, indecisive, pliable, precarious, undecided, undetermined, unresolved, unstable, unsteady, untrustworthy, vacillating, wavering

infirm

(Weak), adjective ailing, debilitated, defective, deteriorated, enfeebled, failing, feeble, flimsy, fragile, frail, frangible, helpless, imperfect, impotent, insecure, languid, nonsubstantial, powerless, sickly, wasted, weakened, withered, worn
See also: defective, imperfect, insecure, insubstantial, nonsubstantial, powerless, precarious, unsound

INFIRM. Weak, feeble.
     2. When a witness is infirm to an extent likely to destroy his life, or to prevent his attendance at the trial, his testimony de bene esge may be taken at any age. 1 P. Will. 117; see Aged witness.; Going witness.

References in classic literature ?
Sedley, who was growing infirm and was much shaken, remained silent or wept a great deal with Mrs.
Crawling behind an infirm horse, a metropolitan hackney carriage drew up on wobbly wheels and with a maimed driver on the box.
In the narrow streets the progress of the journey was made sensible to those within by the near fronts of the houses gliding past slowly and shakily, with a great rattle and jingling of glass, as if about to collapse behind the cab; and the infirm horse, with the harness hung over his sharp backbone flapping very loose about his thighs, appeared to be dancing mincingly on his toes with infinite patience.
Stevie could have managed easily to keep pace with the infirm, dancing horse without getting out of breath.
that a house serves no purpose, Arthur, in sheltering your infirm and afflicted--justly infirm and righteously afflicted--mother?
Perhaps his mother now occupied a poorer seat, or possibly she had grown infirm and could not reach the church alone.
There were strange faces in almost every house; in some he recognised the burly form of some old schoolfellow--a boy when he last saw him--surrounded by a troop of merry children; in others he saw, seated in an easy-chair at a cottage door, a feeble and infirm old man, whom he only remembered as a hale and hearty labourer; but they had all forgotten him, and he passed on unknown.
The sexton, as he could not reach to touch him with his crutch, and was too infirm to rise without assistance, called his attention by throwing a little mould upon his red nightcap.
I am sure that there are other positive changes that could be made to improve the system and better serve the social function of taking care of our old and infirm in a manner that honors their social contributions and affords them respect.
This is clearly bad news for all those customers who use the facilities provided by those post offices which are under threat, particularly the elderly and infirm who rely so heavily on these community facilities.
How, critics ask, can we pay them that amount for sitting around for a few hours every morning handing out advice to the old, infirm and hypochondriac?
She called it a trendy issue, "morally hollow," where "merciful death is but a shallow platitude" used by those who want to be relieved of the burden of caring for someone who is desperately ill, or infirm, or frail.