influenced


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Related to influenced: indubitably, impinge, brilliant, easily influenced, intricacies

influenced

adjective biased, decided, induced, interested, one-sided, partial, partisan, prejudiced, prepossessed, swayed, undetached, unfair
Associated concepts: unduly influenced
See also: interested, one-sided, partial, partisan, passive, unequal, unjust
References in periodicals archive ?
The editorial points to the supporting evidence of data in the study showing high variation in the ranges of smoking prevalence among the school districts, thereby indicating other variables influenced tobacco use.
is deeply influenced by the esoterism of the 600 pages of Edouard Schure's book Les Grands Inilies given to him by his master l'Eplatenier.
1995) found that eating disorder correlates in female varsity athletes were influenced by the interaction of perceived social pressures from teammates regarding body weight or size, performance anxiety, and negative self-appraisal of athletic achievement.
Behind pre-Soviet Russian culture, then, are the same philosophers who influenced Weimar Germany.
All other properties were also influenced significantly by [S.
CheapToday Online Shopping Network survey reveals that fashion styles for Women Shoppers are most influenced by Best Friends followed by Parents, Siblings, and Favorite Entertainers
The political issues, social problems, and unstable economic development are interwoven and have influenced the opportunity structure of the work world.
At these points, the primary and intermediate teachers realized that their actions influenced students' opportunities to learn, and this insight changed their conceptions about teaching and learning.
The department saw an opportunity to develop an affordable media relations tool that would not only measure output but also measure how well the department influenced news media coverage.
Relying on drunkard narratives and civil damage suits in particular, Parsons uses temperance reform to show how "Americans harbored serious concerns that individuals were so influenced and shaped by their environment that they had little control over their own character and actions" (4) and how they grappled with that predicament.
Throughout, Collins' analyses of cultural artifacts, though not always easy reading, convince the reader that the Soledades, if not directly influenced by each and every one of the literary and social phenomena she mentions, at the very least is an artifact of the same enigmatic type as many others which were favored by the elite, courtly intellectual culture of seventeenth-century Spain.
Thus, both aggressive and nonaggressive adult models had influenced children's behavior.