inheritance

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Inheritance

Property received from a decedent, either by will or through state laws of intestate succession, where the decedent has failed to execute a valid will.

inheritance

n. whatever one receives upon the death of a relative due to the laws of descent and distribution, when there is no will. However, inheritance has come to mean anything received from the estate of a person who has died, whether by the laws of descent or as a beneficiary of a will or trust. (See: inherit, heir, heiress, descent and distribution, intestacy, intestate succession, will)

inheritance

noun appanage, benefaction, bequest, devise, dispensation, endowment, gift, hereditas, heritage, inherited property, legacy, presentation, property obtained by descent, property obtained by devise, provision, seisin, succession of property
Associated concepts: coparcenary, curtesy, descent, dower, inheritance estate, inheritance tax, intestate succession, patrimony, wills
Foreign phrases: Haereditas, alia corporalis, alia incorpooalis; corporalis est, quae tangi potest et videri; incorpooalis quae tangi non potest nec videri.An inheritance is eiiher corporeal or incorporeal; corporeal is that which can be touched and seen; incorporeal is that which can neither be touched nor seen. Feodum simplex quia feodum idem est quod haereditas, et simplex idem est quod legitimum vel purum; et sic feodum simplex idem est quod haereditas legitima vel haereditas pura. A fee-simple is so called beeause fee is the same as inheritance, and simple is the same as lawful or pure; and so fee-simple is the same as a lawful inneritance or pure inheritance. Filius est nomen naturae, sed haeres nomen juris. Son is the natural name, but heir is aname of law. Haeredum appellatione veniunt haeredes haeredumin infinitum. Under the name heirs come the heirs of heirs without limit. Haereditas est successio in univerrum jus quod defunctus habuerit. Inheritance is the succession to every right which the deceased had possessed. Haereditas nihil aliud est, quam successio in universum jus, quod defunctus habuerit. An inheritance is nothing other than the succession to all the rights which the deceased had. Si quis praegnantem uxorem reliquit, non videtur sine liberis decessisse. If a man dies, leaving his wife preggant, he is considered as having died childless. Major haereditas venit unicuique nostrum a jure et legibus quam a parentibus. A greater inheritance comes to each one of us from justice and the laws than from our parents.
See also: bequest, birth, birthright, dower, estate, hereditament, heritage, legacy, lineage

inheritance

1 hereditary succession to an estate or title.
2 the right of an heir to succeed to property on the death of an ancestor.
3 something that may legally be transmitted to an heir.

INHERITANCE, estates. A perpetuity in lands to a man and his heirs; or it is the right to succeed to the estate of a person who died intestate. Dig. 50, 16, 24. The term is applied to lands.
     2. The property which is inherited is called an inheritance.
     3. The term inheritance includes not only lands and tenements which have been acquired by descent, but also every fee simple or fee tail, which a person has acquired by purchase, may be said to be an inheritance, because the purchaser's heirs may inherit it. Litt. s. 9.
     4. Estates of inheritance are divided into inheritance absolute, or fee simple; and inheritance limited, one species of which is called fee tail. They are also divided into corporeal, as houses and lands and incorporeal, commonly called incorporeal hereditaments. (q. v.) 1 Cruise, Dig. 68; Sw. 163; Poth. des Retraits, n. 2 8.
     5. Among the civilians, by inheritance is understood the succession to all the rights of the deceased. It is of two kinds, 1 . That which arises by testament, when the testator gives his succession to a particular person; and, 2. That which arises by operation of law, which is called succession ab intestat. Hein. Lec. El. Sec. 484, 485.

References in periodicals archive ?
Dozens of Egyptian social media users, women and men, have changed their photos on social media channels with frames including slogans of "equality in inheritance is a right not a privilege," and further expressed solidarity with issue through opinion posts and hashtags.
Since my father's death, my brothers have refused to give me my inheritance share, saying that women do not have the right to inheritance," she told Gulf News.
This includes not only assets they have at the time they file for bankruptcy, but also comprises of any assets that "devolve" on the bankrupt prior to discharge such as an inheritance "received" during bankruptcy.
In thinking about this as a methodology of "inheritance stories," I examined my own life and immediately came up with five ways of conceptualizing inheritance: Objects & Heirlooms, Spiritual, Gestures & Genetics, Citations (intellectual inheritances, citational practices), and Land (inheritor of Treaty 7).
WHILE inheritance tax was at one time the concern of very wealthy families and individuals, now it affects more and more people.
It found that inheritances do not significantly affect the retirement security of the population as a whole.
In addition to an estate tax, New Jersey also has an inheritance tax (see New Jersey Statutes Annotated [NJSA] section 54:5-1).
Wolff of New York University and Maury Gittleman of the Bureau of Labor Statistics investigate two main questions: First, have inheritances and other wealth transfers become more important over time?
Meanwhile, one in eight inheritances included personal possessions and a further 6.
Establishing the exact time of death of the one leaving the inheritance has a great practical importance for the following reasons:
THE amount of money left to loved ones in inheritance will jump to pounds 1.
At first (1790), French law declared that intestacy proceedings would divide inheritances equally among the children, but eventually (Code Civil, 1804) all inheritances were to be divided equally among the children, a rule that continues to govern France to this day.

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