inhospitality


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See: ostracism
References in periodicals archive ?
Australia's culture and politics have also suffered from its inhospitality toward asylum seekers.
Accepting, owning, and then passing on the poisoned gift from the barbaric French officer responsible for the massacre of refugees in Algerian caves--his voice, his memory, his narrative--Djebar invents a new form of resistance to absolute inhospitality.
and ultimately replaced the inhospitality tradition in the late 1970s.
Inhospitality is about tending one's own garden and locking the gate; it's about greed and fear.
Memmi's own vision of a society able to negotiate multiple relations and promote hospitality can be gleaned from discussions of his own case history as he struggled against political oppression and inhospitality.
It's one thing for Grunwald to praise the Recovery Act as a Trojan horse for Obama's entire domestic agenda, but another for him to berate the citizens of Troy for their inhospitality after the soldiers emerged from it.
13) This situation has caused stable rumors on inhospitality in Ikh Khuree and disagreements between the two hierarchs.
The inhospitality of the region is compounded by regional insecurity he added.
The article begins by providing context that illustrates the place-based and diffuse nature of an ongoing culture war between civil rights and religious freedom, further exposing the painful irony inherent in using misinterpretations of the Sodom and Gomorrah parable to reinforce inhospitality.
Jen Gilbert has used the ethic of hospitality to think through the particular inhospitality faced by queer children and youth.
In most Ghanaian societies, refusing a request from another person intentionally without any excuse indicates one's insensitivity and inhospitality to the person's request.
257) Cohen notes that the inhospitality to refugees has independent causes linked to the end of the Cold War and a lack of political advantage, as well as security and cost concerns.