innuendo

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innuendo

n. from Latin innuere, "to nod toward." In law it means "an indirect hint." "Innuendo" is used in lawsuits for defamation (libel or slander), usually to show that the party suing was the person about whom the nasty statements were made or why the comments were defamatory. Example: "the former Mayor is a crook," and Joe Alabaster is the only living ex-Mayor, thus by innuendo Alabaster is the target of the statement; or "Joe Alabaster was paid $100,000 by the Hot Springs Water Company," when it was known that Hot Springs was bucking for a contract with the city. The innuendo is that Alabaster took a bribe. (See: defamation, libel, slander)

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.

innuendo

see DEFAMATION.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

INNUENDO, pleading. An averment which explains the defendant's meaning by reference to antecedent matter. Salk. 513; 1 Ld. Raym. 256; 12 Mod. 139; 1 Saund. 243. The innuendo is mostly used in actions for slander. An innuendo, as, "he the said plaintiff meaning," is only explanatory of some matter expressed; it serves to apply the slander to the precedent matter, but cannot add or enlarge, extend, or change the sense of the previous words, and the matter to which it alludes must always appear from the antecedent parts of the declaration or indictment. 1 Chit. Pl. 383; 3 Caines' Rep. 76; 7 Johns. R. 271; 5 Johns. R. 211; 8 Johns. R. 109; 8 N. H. Rep. 256.
     3. It is necessary only when the intent may be mistaken, or when it cannot be collected from the libel or slander itself. Cowp. 679; 5 East, 463.
     4. If the innuendo materially enlarge the sense of the words it will vitiate the declaration or indictment. 6 T. R. 691; 5 Binn. 218; 5 Johns. R. 220; 6 Johns. R. 83; 7 Johns. Rep. 271. But when the new matter stated in an innuendo is not necessary to support the action, it may be rejected as surplusage. 9 East, R. 95; 7 Johns. R. 272. Vide, generally, Stark. on Slan. 293; 1 Chit. Pl. 383; 3 Chit. Cr. Law, 873; Bac. Ab. Slander, R; 1 Saund. 243, n. 4; 4 Com. Dig. 712; 14 Vin. Ab. 442; Dane's Ab. Index, h. t.; 4 Co. 17.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the second Craftsman trial (1731), Lord Chief Justice Raymond argued expressly that innuendoes no longer functioned simply to clarify identities previously specified in the information, but that the court had the prerogative to ascribe whatever "constructions" it pleased.
Until the passage of Fox's Libel Law in 1792, it was the jury's responsibility merely to determine the "facts" of publication (whether a particular author or printer had actually produced the work in question), and whether ambiguous descriptions (innuendoes) actually referred to the persons mentioned.
The more perceptive readers will pick up on the subtle innuendoes. Some may do research on the London Blitz and learn more about "...
"The gossip and rumors and innuendoes in the chat rooms and forums on the World Wide Web are threatening to ruin the reputations of people and companies who cannot defend themselves simply because they don't know what's being said.
So cute, their denigratory innuendoes! Her nuns "wander around" the famous Home for the Dying, "stabbing" people with needles, predicting "This one will die," and letting patients who are dying themselves try to help the stricken.
Marines in WW II will have difficulty turning this one off; even though it is not "politically correct" by today's standards with some appalling ethnic references, profanity, sexual innuendoes, and violence.
I regret to have to say that I was provoked into writing this letter by Mr BG Bubb, (Post, Dec 19 and 21), who seems intent on continuing The Daily Mail smear campaign with his innuendoes against Mrs Blair.
There is some light profanity and there are also some sexual innuendoes, but these are consistent with the time period and setting and are mild compared to much of what is acceptable in today's literature.
Bishop includes just enough shape-changing, sexual situations, and innuendoes to appeal to a YA audience without offending most parents.