innuendo

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innuendo

n. from Latin innuere, "to nod toward." In law it means "an indirect hint." "Innuendo" is used in lawsuits for defamation (libel or slander), usually to show that the party suing was the person about whom the nasty statements were made or why the comments were defamatory. Example: "the former Mayor is a crook," and Joe Alabaster is the only living ex-Mayor, thus by innuendo Alabaster is the target of the statement; or "Joe Alabaster was paid $100,000 by the Hot Springs Water Company," when it was known that Hot Springs was bucking for a contract with the city. The innuendo is that Alabaster took a bribe. (See: defamation, libel, slander)

innuendo

noun accusation, allusion, aside, charge, connotation, denuntiatio, hint, implication, implied indication, imputation, incrimination, indication, innirect allusion, inference, insinuation, mention, nuntius, oblique allusion, overtone, reference, reflection, suggestion
Associated concepts: defamation, disparagement, libel, slander
See also: connotation, implication, indication, inference, insinuation, intimation, reference, referral, suggestion

innuendo

see DEFAMATION.

INNUENDO, pleading. An averment which explains the defendant's meaning by reference to antecedent matter. Salk. 513; 1 Ld. Raym. 256; 12 Mod. 139; 1 Saund. 243. The innuendo is mostly used in actions for slander. An innuendo, as, "he the said plaintiff meaning," is only explanatory of some matter expressed; it serves to apply the slander to the precedent matter, but cannot add or enlarge, extend, or change the sense of the previous words, and the matter to which it alludes must always appear from the antecedent parts of the declaration or indictment. 1 Chit. Pl. 383; 3 Caines' Rep. 76; 7 Johns. R. 271; 5 Johns. R. 211; 8 Johns. R. 109; 8 N. H. Rep. 256.
     3. It is necessary only when the intent may be mistaken, or when it cannot be collected from the libel or slander itself. Cowp. 679; 5 East, 463.
     4. If the innuendo materially enlarge the sense of the words it will vitiate the declaration or indictment. 6 T. R. 691; 5 Binn. 218; 5 Johns. R. 220; 6 Johns. R. 83; 7 Johns. Rep. 271. But when the new matter stated in an innuendo is not necessary to support the action, it may be rejected as surplusage. 9 East, R. 95; 7 Johns. R. 272. Vide, generally, Stark. on Slan. 293; 1 Chit. Pl. 383; 3 Chit. Cr. Law, 873; Bac. Ab. Slander, R; 1 Saund. 243, n. 4; 4 Com. Dig. 712; 14 Vin. Ab. 442; Dane's Ab. Index, h. t.; 4 Co. 17.

References in periodicals archive ?
My work in television brings me into an environment where people are always hugging, kissing and making innuendos, some of them crude.
If they need an excuse for me to provide an innuendo I will give them one.
Fan Chloe Ellerton said: "Great British Bake Off full of innuendos tonight.
IT loves the term "soggy bottom" and now fans of the Great British Bake Off believe innuendo is becoming the programme's main ingredient.