inoperability


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concealment of inoperability is pervasive, thereby producing a countless
It is this view of enablement--or more precisely, equating enablement to inoperability in cases like Eli Lilly--that wrongly conflates the two doctrines.
A finding of inoperability means that the claimed invention lacks a credible utility.
It is critical to note that in many cases, the inoperability of
Despite the inoperability of some cases of gallbladder cancer in the fourth clinical stage, described in the literature, the authors of this work have shown some benefits of conducting extended surgical procedures in this group of patients.
Inoperability was determined by diagnostic imaging techniques, including ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) scan and endoscopic ultrasound.
The intraoperative staging did not confirm the preoperative radiological findings in 14 cases, which did not generally lead to inoperability. One-year survival rate was 86% in resected patients and 37.5% in nonresected patients.
Here, inoperability was defined by the presence of distant metastases or an unfavorable preoperative risk score.
The running thread in Dussel's analysis, however, is the ambiguity of the law; that is the inoperability and indiscernability of the law, or what Agamben calls the unobservability and unformulability of the law (Agamben 2005:105-6).
(27) Because Alaska Airlines notes that "[t]he more relevant inquiry in evaluating severability is whether the statute will function in a manner consistent with the intent of Congress," (28) remaining provisions that are struck on grounds of legal inoperability could also be described as having been struck because Congress would not have enacted them without the unconstitutional provision.
"Interdependent Impacts of Inoperability at Multi-Modal Transportation Container Terminals." Transportation Research Part E 47 (5): 722-73.