insurgent

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insurgent

a person or group that rises in revolt against an established government or authority but whose conduct does not amount to belligerency.
Collins Dictionary of Law © W.J. Stewart, 2006

INSURGENT. One who is concerned in an insurrection. He differs from a rebel in this, that rebel is always understood in a bad sense, or one who unjustly opposes the constituted authorities; insurgent may be one who justly opposes the tyranny of constituted authorities. The colonists who opposed the tyranny of the English government were insurgents, not rebels.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rich, "A Historical Overview of US Counter-Insurgency Policy," Small Wars and Insurgencies 25, no.
The National Liberation Front of Tripura (NLFT) and the All Tripura Tiger Force (ATTF) insurgencies in Tripura are rooted in the sense of alienation of the indigenous tribals as a result of the unhindered migration from Bangladesh (formerly East Bengal/East Pakistan).
The selected cases are the 71 most recent resolved insurgencies, spanning the period from the Second World War through 2010.
In his first chapter, Gleis offers a rapid review of the evolution of insurgency and how, over the past century, we have witnessed an increase in state repression that has served to mobilize the "grass roots" level of society to participate in insurgencies. He then provides a detailed explanation that seeks to define the characteristics of an Islamic insurgency and why they are noteworthy enough to merit a unique label as a fourth-generation mode of warfare.
These are clearly structured, easy to follow, and include ample quotations and references from participants, scholars, and journalists, but if teachers are looking for more, including more than scattered drive-by comparisons of these four insurgencies, or an analysis of what they have meant for insurgents and students of insurgency thereafter, or how those insurgencies shaped our world, they will be disappointed.
After the fall of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, there was an increase in traditionalist insurgencies. Religious fundamentalists expanded their control throughout the Muslim world.
A coalition of individual insurgencies with varying ideologies spread around the world?
The principal difference is that while the Naga, Kashmiri and other ethnic insurgencies are geographically limited, the Maoist uprising has the potential of engulfing the whole country.
First, it seeks to become a primer on the problem of "insurgency, counterinsurgency principles, and the role of air power in countering insurgencies." Secondly, it stresses the need for the demand for advisory assistance.
The military defeat of any particular insurgency does not exclude the possibility of other insurgencies emerging to exploit the very causes that first led to its creation.
Insurgencies and counterinsurgencies create nontraditional battlefields that require a logistician to have excellent planning skills and the ability to adapt.
Not only does the book cover Islamist terrorism--with extensively detailed chapters focusing on various jihadi groups--but it also highlights other non-religious terrorism (such as classic separatist insurgencies), and also includes an extensive analysis of terrorism emanating from the state itself, perhaps the most horrific form of terrorism in terms of scale of violence and numbers of individuals tortured and killed.