Intangibles

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Related to intangible: Intangible property

Intangibles

Property that is a "right" such as a patent, Copyright, or trademark, or one that is lacking physical existence, such as good will. A nonphysical, noncurrent asset that exists only in connection with something else, such as the good will of a business.

References in periodicals archive ?
Global Lessors Of Non-financial Intangible Assets Market Report 2019 provides the strategists, marketers and senior management with the critical information they need to assess the global lessors of non-financial intangible assets market.
The discussion session began with a video presentation by the National Committee for Culture, Education and Science on the elements of the intangible Omani cultural heritage in the Unesco World Heritage List, such as the art of Bara and the art of Al Azi, the art of Rizafah, Al Ayala, the Omani councils, Arabic coffee and horses.
In turn, Secretary General of the Syria Trust for Development Faris Kallas talked about Syria's tangible and intangible heritage, as well as the role of cultural, governmental, and non-governmental organizations in drawing international attention to Syrian heritage and reviving it.
During the 13th session of the Committee, over 800 delegates from 125 countries will be debating on the protection of the intangible cultural heritage of humanity.
Noting the great role of Azerbaijan's First Vice President Mehriban Aliyeva in the formation of close relations between UNESCO and Azerbaijan, Minister noted that over 11 nominations of Azerbaijan were included in the Representative List of Intangible Cultural and Cultural Heritage.
Capitalism without Capital shows that the growing importance of intangible assets has also played a role in some of the big economic changes of the last decade.
The first part of the book definitively documents the rise of the intangible economy using the best available data for a wide range of countries.
If this new economy were to be measured by economists, the valuation of these intangible assets would need to be incorporated into their models of economic growth.
98 States Parties to the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage voted for Kazakhstan.
Haskel and Westlake's main point is that the biggest substantive difference in the two valuations processes is that the 11th Century valuation counted only tangible capital (a mill, livestock, slaves), while the modern valuation also included intangible capital (software, relationships with airlines and retailers, organizational know-how).
Intangible cultural heritage (ICH) is half of the heritage story.