intellectualize

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As Bottum tells the tale, what little an intellectualized faith was able to accomplish, the clerical sexual abuse scandal brought to a rapid halt.
We have plenty of materials written in Filipino, but it can be fully intellectualized only if we continuously teach it as a subject in higher education, while at the same time progressively using it as a medium of instruction in a number of, if not all subjects.
Instead of Madsen's perspective, which is in the final analysis pastoral and passionate, his trajectory is more intellectualized.
The native courts applying non-Islamic or volk Islamic laws and the elite Shari'a courts applying intellectualized Islamic law continued as bad neighbors.
Like all great mysteries, the teaching is meant to be entered into and lived rather than intellectualized.
Most of the material on Asian-American queer folks is very intellectualized, heady theses projects that aren't accessible," she said.
Poetry," Bonnefoy affirms, "is wanting the here and now to assume precedence over dreams," a precedence the prestige of language and concept and intellectualized structure ever pull us away from, privileging not the "absolute inconceivableness" of the absoluteness of givenness but rather the relativity of proud human rationalizing and equation of being.
It also involves an intellectualized approach exemplified by conservative hero Mark Steyn.
Leaping off these walls one can imagine larger views of intellectualized landscapes as seen in the paintings of Lucio Pozzi and Michael Goldberg.
Other work attempted social commentary, like Montrealer Martin Belanger's Spoken word/body and a curious piece of intellectualized erotica called Gold, by Switzerland's Alexandra Bachzetsis.
Robert Evans defends the artistry of Donne's elegy on the death of Lady Markham by noting that it and his other poems of mourning "seek deliberately to master passion by controlling and redirecting thought" (55); he sees Jonson's lyric on the death of Lady Venetia Digby as less intellectualized and more personal, but both works share similarities in purpose and execution.