interdict

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interdict

in Scotland, an order of a court prohibiting conduct. Only in certain occasions may it have a positive effect. See INJUNCTION.

INTERDICT, civil Among the Romans it was an ordinance of the praetor, which forbade or enjoined the parties in a suit to do something particularly specified, until it should be decided definitely who had the right in relation to it. Like an injunction, the interdict was merely personal in its effects and it had also another similarity to it, by being temporary or perpetual. Dig. 43, 1, 1, 3, and 4. See Story, E Jur. 865; Halif. Civ. Law, ch. 6 Vicat, Vocab. h. v.; Hein. Elem. Pand. Ps. 6, Sec. 285. Vide Injunction.

INTERDICT, OR INTERDICTION, eccles. law. An ecclesiastical censure, by which divine services are prohibited either to particular persons or particular places. These tyrannical edicts, issued by ecclesiastical powers, have never been in force in the United States.

References in periodicals archive ?
It was also more developmental and facilitatory and less preventive and interdictive. The typical East Asian state was a facilitator and promoter of the activities of the private sector and tried to "crowd in" rather than "crowd out" private investment.
Davis's elegant variation of Blanchot's French title (Celui qui ne m'accompagnait pas--a "straight" translation might be "The One (or He) Who Was Not Accompanying Me") carries in the word apart the echo of Blanchot's ambivalent terminal pas--both a "step" and a prohibition, an advancement and an interdictive "no." This double movement, of uncertainty, paradox--something given and something taken away--works at the heart of Blanchot's writing.