disorder

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Related to intermittent explosive disorder: borderline personality disorder, Oppositional defiant disorder

disorder

a disturbance of public order or peace. Its existence may trigger extended police powers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Intermittent explosive disorder is common, has an early age of onset and is associated with the development of other mental disorders in the US population.
Epidemiological aspects of intermittent explosive disorder in Japan; prevalence and psychosocial comorbidity: findings from the World Mental Health Japan Survey 2002-2006.
The prevalence and correlates of DSM-IV intermittent explosive disorder in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication.
The relationship between impulsive verbal aggression and intermittent explosive disorder. Aggressive Behavior, 34, 51-60.
Intermittent explosive disorder features tirades, grossly disproportionate to the triggering circumstances, during which a person destroys property, tries to hurt or actually hurts someone, or threatens to do so.
For lifetime-prevalence figures in the new survey, broadly defined intermittent explosive disorder consisted of at least three such episodes during a person's life.
The findings, published in the June Archives of General Psychiatry, indicate that intermittent explosive disorder typically begins during adolescence and lasts for at least a decade, with an average of 43 episodes per person.
Treatment with the SSRI fluoxetine at 20-60 mg/day was more effective than placebo for patients with intermittent explosive disorder in randomized, controlled studies by Dr.
Concern that fluoxetine might increase aggression in patients with intermittent explosive disorder was allayed by a randomized, controlled study in 2006 by Dr.
Matthews mailed follow-up questionnaires to the parents and guardians of 74 children and adolescents who had received at least 60 days of residential treatment for impulsive aggression; all of the patients had been diagnosed with severe attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and intermittent explosive disorder. The questionnaire was mailed at the time of discharge and parents were asked to return it within 2 weeks of receipt.
While impulsive aggression is the hallmark of one diagnosis (intermittent explosive disorder), the behavioral disturbance often figures prominently in bipolar disorder, cluster B personality disorders, impulse-control disorders, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, substance-use disorders, posttraumatic stress disorder, and autism.
His anger was aroused almost without provocation and was such as that seen in severe attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and intermittent explosive disorder. He had borderline narcissistic personality traits and significant learning disabilities.

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