interregnum


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See: abeyance, anarchy, cessation, duration, hiatus, interval, lull, pendency

interregnum

a time during which the throne is vacant.

INTERREGNUM, polit. law. In an established government, the period which elapses between the death of a sovereign and the election of another is called interregnum. It is also understood for the vacancy created in the executive power, and for any vacancy which occurs when there is no government.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although it veers too far into counterfactual history on occasion, this book, and the research grounding it, will benefit future studies of military, local, and political histories of the Interregnum.
Fukuyama was mistaken to associate this interregnum with the Hegelian (or I suppose Kojevian) "end of history.
Asaph in 1704; John Wilkins, warden of Wadham, who became bishop of Chester in 1668; Seth Ward, the Savilian professor of astronomy during the Interregnum, who became bishop of Exeter in 1662; Edward Reynolds, a former Presbyterian, who became bishop of Norwich at the Restoration; John Hacket, appointed bishop of Lichfield and Coventry in 1661; John Pearson, Lady Margaret professor at Cambridge, who became bishop of Chester in 1673; and a host of lesser luminaries, such as John Wallis, William Jane, Robert South, and Thomas Tully.
Lord Mandelson's return from his own break on the Greek island of Corfu, finally brought an end to a three-day interregnum in which no senior minister was apparently in charge in London.
The US considers that having no interregnum between the original end of President Karzais term and the elections is conducive to stability in Afghanistan; it will not require any other political arrangement for that time period, Duguid told reporters in response to a question.
For so many years, scholars of English Renaissance drama accepted the proposition that no women performed on stage until the Restoration and when they did appear on English stages, it was assumed their advent was the direct result of English exposure to female actresses in Europe during the Interregnum.
There are those who fear the interregnum between now and Jan.
Regrettably, this book is indicative of what we're likely to see during poker's interregnum, which would suggest that numbers demanding a return to the previous structure could prove overwhelming.
He argues that the term interregnum "detracts from the importance of these years, reducing them to a dark interlude between the reigns of Bayezid I and Mehmet I .
Three chapters and an interlude on Interregnum poetry develop Milton's self-representation against the prelates, his "self-concerned" tracts regarding divorce and its aftermath, and his performances defending Parliamentary leaders and himself before the Restoration.
Her sound ranges from the musical playfulness of a piece like 'Angles" (with its fractured words, percussive finale, and references to musical terms) to daily journal pieces like the "Sky Scrapers" sequence (luxuriating in Lancashire diphthongs, speech rhythms, thick consonantal clusters, and slowed syllables) to the intense, sensuous, and political articulations of Interregnum and Escafeld Hangings that grab us by the neck and rattle our bones.
After the Interregnum, his first cousin, Charles II, made Rupert Governor of Windsor Castle, where the Prince displayed his customary energy, not least in repairing the defences and improving the armament of the soldiers: Rupert thought halberds more appropriate than pikes.