interrogation


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interrogation

n. questioning of a suspect or witness by law enforcement authorities. Once a person being questioned is arrested (is a "prime" suspect) he/she is entitled to be informed of his/her legal rights, and in no case may the interrogation violate rules of due process. (See: Miranda Warning)

interrogation

noun catechization, examination, exploration, formal questioning, grilling, inquest, inquiry, inquisition, inspection, investigation, percontatio, probe, quaestio, query, questioning, scrutiny, search, taking information
Associated concepts: grand jury inquiry, interrogation of a party to an action, interrogation of a witness
See also: cross-examination, examination, hearing, indagation, inquest, inquiry, investigation, question, test
References in periodicals archive ?
In a 1997 article, Ofshe and Leo reviewed interrogation transcripts
The military profession's inculcation of virtues, he argues, is what led the military (that is, service JAGs) to oppose abusive interrogation tactics, and it would behoove other professions to follow the military's example.
The problem is that enhanced interrogation has a long history, even if it wasn't called by that euphemism.
2) The CIAwronglyclaimed "enhanced interrogation" had "saved lives"
This is a political document, not a dispassionate history, but that's part of its value: There simply is no way for a democracy to get past a trauma like the interrogation issue without an honest public accounting.
Much of the information that the CIA provided to the media about its interrogation and detentions program was inaccurate, preventing clear scrutiny of detainees' treatment.
The report debunks the top 20 examples CIA has used to defend the now-shuttered enhanced interrogation program, claiming that each of the examples "was found to be wrong in fundamental respects."
Bush did not agree and made a distinction between "torture", which it accepted is banned by US and international law, and "enhanced interrogation techniques".
The Washington Post recently quoted officials who had seen the full report as saying the CIA concealed key information, overstated "the significance of plots" and falsely credited its brutal interrogation techniques with yielding vital pieces of intelligence that already had been provided by detainees.
The report added, "Israeli courts and intelligence services rely on the results of investigations conducted in informer rooms without questioning and scrutinizing the interrogation methods used in these rooms."
Mr Panetta, who is due to step down following the confirmation of Chuck Hagel, President Obama's nominee to replace Mr Panetta, by the US Senate, went on to say, however, that the US could still have located bin Laden without using such controversial interrogation techniques.
Kathryn Kase, director of the Texas Defender Service, an organization that represents death row inmates, said that two years ago she worked closely with the Texas Police Chiefs Association on a bill that narrowed the number of crimes for which an interrogation recording would be required.