intransigency


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So, one must be aware of snobbism, convenience, self-sufficiency, intransigency or pedantery.
When campus radical and leftist professors are not moaning about how the dreaded Israel Lobby is attempting to suppress all criticism of Israel, or complaining about how any scrutiny of radical Islam, Palestinian terror, or Arab intransigency constitutes "hate speech" that will intimidate or harass Muslims, they have found other means to ensure that countervailing opinions about Israel and the Palestinians are shut out.
Yet because Kartosuwiryo's political intransigency was common to several other nationalists within the Indonesian Republic, who, however, did not rise in arms against it, Elson and Formichi conclude that his resort to violence 'was a function of the repeated interplay of contingency and locally motivated reaction' at an historical juncture, the 1940s, when 'Islamism escaped the constraining bonds of mainstream nationalism and nationalist discourse'.
To argue that any proposed increase in tax revenues is bad policy is the kind of political intransigency that makes for good campaign slogans, but makes governing nearly impossible.
The intransigency of the Tamil Tigers was clearly the stumbling block for any negotiation for a peaceful settlement.
The Syrian envoy said that during discussion of the resolution, his country has offered many concessions to reach a compromise, but it was faced with intransigency from the US envoy.
On the other hand, Left intellectuals like Michael Parenti appear irritated by the intransigency of RAWA's firm stance against all occupation, including that of the Soviets (Kolhatkar, p.
Such a step will not make any positive contribution to negotiation process and on the contrary, it will encourage Greek Cypriot party on the way to intransigency," he noted.
But trapped between the Japanese government's ineffectuality and the intransigency of the United States, peaceful options are very quickly running out.
Opheim, priest-director at All Saints Church Community Centre, calls this place "the epicentre of homelessness and intransigency.
Odd as it might seem, it is not the portrayal of maternal violence that is shocking, but Kristeva's title 'motherhood today'-not parenthood or fatherhood or the changing contours of family structures, not intimate publics or intimate citizens or new forms of intimate life; and not just the glamorised pregnant and post-pregnant celebrity body, and its counter-part the relentlessly demonised young working-class mum-but the ordinary, ongoing work of motherhood, in whatever shape or form that may take, in all its unglamorous intransigency.
On one level the operative factors are obvious: Intransigency by civic groups, political infighting by city officials, the obduracy of Olympic officials and the realities, physical and practical, of the urban landscape.