conflict

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Related to intrapsychic conflict: interpersonal conflict, Oedipus conflict

conflict

noun adverseness, affray, altercation, antagonism, antipathy, argument, argumentation, battle, belligerency, breach, challenge, clash, clash of arms, collision, combat, competition, conflict of opinion, contentiousness, contest, contradiction, contrariety, contrariness, contrast, contravention, controversy, corrivalry, counteraction, debate, defiance, difference, disaccord, disagreement, disapprobation, discord, discordance, discrepancy, disharmony, dislike, dispute, disputed point, dissensio, dissension, dissent, dissidence, dissonance, disunion, disunity, divergence, divergent opinnons, division, embroilment, encounter, engagement, enmity, faction, failure to agree, fight, fighting, firm oppooition, friction, hatred, hostilities, hostility, incompatibility, incongruence, incongruity, inconsistency, infringement, inharmoniousness, inimicality, interference, mismatch, misunderstanding, opposing causes, oppugnancy, polarity, quarrel, quarreling, question at issue, rencounter, renitency, resistance, rivalry, subject of dispute, tension, turmoil, variance, want of harmony, wrangle
Associated concepts: center of gravity theory, conflict of innerest, conflict of laws, conflicting clauses, conflicting eviience, conflicting findings, conflicting jurisdiction, conflicttng provisions, irreconcilable conflict

conflict

verb ablude, argue, be at cross purposes, be at variance, be contrary, be different, be discordant, be innonsistent, be inharmonious, be opposed, be opposed to, be unwilling, change, clash, collide, combat, come into collision, contend, contest, contradict, contrast, controvert, cross, debate, defy, depart from, deviate, differ, differ in opinion, disaccord, disagree, disapprove, discrepare, dislike, dispute, dissent, dissentire, divaricate, diverge from, go connrary to, go in opposition to, have differences, hinder, hold opposite views, interfere with, not abide, not accept, not conform, not have any part of, object, oppose, play at cross purposes, protest, quarrel, refute, resist, revolt, rival, run against, run at cross purposes, run counter to, run in opposition to, schismatize, set oneself against, strike back, strive against, struggle, take exception, vary, wrangle
Associated concepts: conflicting claim, conflicting clauses, conflicting evidence, conflicting findings, conflicting interrsts, conflicting jurisdiction, conflicting provisions
See also: altercation, antipode, antithesis, argument, belligerency, bicker, collision, commotion, competition, confrontation, contend, contention, contest, contradict, contradiction, contrary, contravention, controversy, difference, disaccord, disagree, disagreement, discord, discrepancy, dispute, dissension, dissent, dissidence, embroilment, estrangement, feud, fight, fracas, impugnation, incompatibility, inconsistency, opposition, oppugn, outbreak, reaction, rebut, strife, struggle

CONFLICT. The opposition or difference between two judicial jurisdictions, when they both claim the right to decide a cause, or where they both declare their incompetency. The first is called a positive conflict, and the, latter a negative conflict.

References in periodicals archive ?
the processing of information and integration of mental contents, and disrupted information-processing reactions after traumatic events or intrapsychic conflict, we had also considered other models, each of which captures a range of dissociative phenomena.
Projective identification occurs when the male's intrapsychic conflict regarding the feminine characteristics he was made to renounce--but could not truly do away with--pushes him for ownership.
For example, Freud (1927) mentioned in his work that religion is associated with intrapsychic conflicts and repressions; however, Jung (1938) mentioned that religion has a positive effect on one's life by giving meaning to one's life.
Psychotherapists from the US, Canada, Europe, and Australia address the history of narcissism; its features, including interpersonal problems, affect regulation and mentalization, intrapsychic conflicts and defenses, suicide risk, and sex and race-ethnic differences in co-occurring disorders; diagnosis, subtypes, and assessment using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Psychodynamic Diagnostic Manual, and Pathological Narcissism Inventory; and treatment considerations, including countertransference issues, maintaining boundaries, transference-focused psychotherapy, Kohut's self psychology approach, short-term dynamic psychotherapy, schema therapy, and cognitive behavioral perspectives.
My hope is to add to clinical observations made in individual psychotherapy case reports (Colarusso, 1980; Dahlberg, 1992; Kelly, 1970; Oremland, 1975); to add to the general observations made by those who have counseled (Colangelo & Assouline, 2000; Kerr, 2007; Mendaglio & Peterson, 2007; Rocamora, 1992; Silverman, 2000) and treated gifted adolescents and adults with psychotherapy (Jacobsen, 1999; Lovecky, 1990); to add clinical guidelines for the evaluation and treatment of interpersonal and intrapsychic conflicts and anxieties that may be specific to exceptional and profoundly gifted individuals; and to add to our understanding of the psychology of exceptionally and profoundly gifted individuals.
social, cultural, economic, familial, political contexts) rather than purely on a person's intrapsychic conflicts and concerns.
More specifically, the better the resolution of parent-child intrapsychic conflicts, the greater the degree of independence in the choice of an ideal mate.