Invest

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invest

v. to put money into a business or buy property or securities for the purpose of eventually obtaining a profit. This is distinguished from a gift or a loan made merely to accommodate a friend or taking a complete gamble. (See: investment)

TO INVEST, contracts. To lay out money in such a manner that it may bring a revenue; as, to invest money in houses or stocks; to give possession.
     2. This word, which occurs frequently in the canon law, comes from the Latin word investire, which signifies to clothe or adorn and is used, in that system of jurisprudence, synonymously with enfeoff. Both words signify to put one into the possession of, or to invest with a fief, upon his taking the oath of fealty or fidelity to the prince or superior lord.

References in periodicals archive ?
Although Mack's SEP is fully invested in stocks, she has conservative holdings, too.
He says Slater has invested in 16 companies since 2000 and that the "sweet spot" investment is typically $250,000 at first.
Our fund allows investors the opportunity to invest in our significant, off-market deal flow generated through our network of real estate operators."
National Association of Real Estate Investment Trusts (NAREIT) research has found that the majority of university endowments invest through real estate investment funds managed by outside managers or through real estate investment trusts.
P then directly loans the $1,000 to S, which directly invests the proceeds in exempt obligations.
By 2010, the Fund will have invested in approximately 20 small- to medium-scale ventures.
Their 401(k) plans, which are invested in Standard & Poor's 500-stock index funds, are not doing well.
the company said it used the proceeds from these real estate sales to invest in public and private fixed maturities and shares in real estate investment trusts.
With an initial commitment of $50 million the company plans to invest in residential housing, office and retail developments initially in Romania.
Benson, who now invests 40 percent of the $300 million Michigan State University Foundation endowment in alternatives, believes that the huge returns generated by some nontraditional investments won't be repeated in the years ahead.
To understand how laddering works, consider a client with $200,000 to invest in bonds.
Balanced funds, which invest in both stocks and bonds, have been hit hard by recent market volatility.