cell

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Related to islet cells: islets of Langerhans

cell

(Enemy combatants), noun enemy group, exxremist group, rebel organization, saboteurs, subversives, unnerground extremists
Associated concepts: enemy combatants, justice courts, miliiary tribunals, Patriotic Act, prison cells, sleeper cell, terrorist cell

cell

(jail), noun cage, cella, chamber, compartment, confined room, confinement, cubicle, cubiculum, enclosed cage, incarceration, jailhouse, penitentiary, pound, prison, prison house, small cavity, small room, solitary abode
See also: chamber, jail, penitentiary, prison

CELL. A small room in a prison. See Dungeon.

References in periodicals archive ?
RNA sequencing was then carried out on over 2,200 islet cells to ascertain which genes were expressed and actively involved in cell functions.
The challenge with the device is the number of islet cells it can accommodate successfully--only about 1,000.
And this was in patients 15 years out: Their islet cells weren't dead, as most people said.
An islet cell transplant may be an option for you if you have complications from type-1 diabetes or severe type-1 diabetes that can't be effectively managed with insulin.
Of the 51 patients who did receive 2,000 or more islet cells, 37 required only intermittent insulin or none at all during long-term follow-up.
The islet cells produce insulin which regulates sugar levels in the blood.
The islet cells began producing insulin within minutes of entering the liver, Dr.
Richard Lane, a 61-year-old businessman from Bromley, Kent, is the first person in the UK to have a fully successful islet cell transplantation in a patient with Type 1 diabetes.
Islet cells are found in the pancreas and produce insulin, which is needed to control blood sugar levels.
Until recently most research trying to treat Type I diabetes assumed the patient would receive a islet cells transplant to replace those killed by the marauding white blood cells.
The hope is that these newly-made islet cells will be just as responsive to glucose levels as normal islet cells.
In Type 1 diabetics, the bone marrow allows bad immune cells that attack the insulin-secreting islet cells into the bloodstream.