jealous

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He jealously guarded the margin he had gained, for he knew there were difficult stretches to come.
Collie, clasped in the arms of one of the women, watched him jealously and with a snarl warned him that all was not well.
It was open; but dark curtains, jealously closed, kept out the light from the room within.
Polly made no answer, fearing to pay too much, for she knew Fan had made no confidant of Tom, and she guarded her friend's secret as jealously as her own.
The tall man leaned heavily upon her to take the weight off his tender foot, while he held his burden betwixt himself and the wall, cuddling it jealously to his side, and thrusting forward his young companion to act as a buttress whenever the pressure of the crowd threatened to bear him away.
Jealously surrounded by its own high walls, the cottage suggested, even to the most unimaginative persons, the idea of an asylum or a prison.
Doctor," as she called Anne, with blind fervor, looked rather jealously askance at Marilla at first.
He snubbed the ship-keeper, and tried to think of that insignificant bit of foolishness no more; for it diminished Captain Anthony in his eyes of a jealously devoted subordinate.
As a child he had enjoyed romping and playing with the young apes, his companions; but now these play-fellows of his had grown to surly, lowering bulls, or to touchy, suspicious mothers, jealously guarding helpless balus.
I glanced jealously at Mary Cavendish, but she seemed quite undisturbed, the delicate pallor of her cheeks did not vary.
How fast most of us hold on to them--faster and more jealously, the nearer we are to that general home into which we can take nothing, but must go naked as we came into the world
We should have liked to put some further questions to Daddy Jacques--Jacques--Louis Moustier--but the inquiry of the examining magistrate, which is being carried on at the chateau, makes it impossible for us to gain admission at the Glandier; and, as to the oak wood, it is guarded by a wide circle of policemen, who are jealously watching all traces that can lead to the pavilion, and that may perhaps lead to the discovery of the assassin.